Eskenazi Hospital opens in Indianapolis

Foodservice features include The Marketplace, a retail wing and plans for a "sky farm."

Published in Healthcare Spotlight

Wishard Hospital, which graced Indianapolis for 150 years, is no more. In its place is a sleek 350-bed medical center, known as the Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Hospital. Few people are more excited about the new space, which opened in December, than Tom Thaman, the director of nutrition services at the hospital.

“The hospital was much needed,” Thaman says. “It has the same number of beds as Wishard, but it has a smaller footprint and is a much more efficient use of space. The old hospital was really a series of buildings added over the years, with the oldest being built 150 years ago.”

Thaman has a special reason to be jazzed about the space: He helped to design the foodservice portion. “I have worked in other facilities where I was stuck with whatever foodservice was in place,” he explains. “If we wanted to change the menu we had to do a lot of work, so I had these spaces designed with flexibility in mind.”

The main foodservice operation is The Marketplace, a bright, airy space that features several concepts that lend themselves to menu adaptation. The most popular station thus far is the Italian station, which has a pizza oven that allows Thaman’s staff to prepare and sell customized personal pan pizzas, pizza by the slice and a pasta of the day.

The Marketplace also includes a deli, an enhanced grill station, a double-sided soup and salad bar, an action station and a grab-and-go store. Food wells at each of the stations are designed to be used as either cold wells or hot wells, adding to the flexibility of each station.

“The action station is going to be one of the neatest elements,” says Thaman, noting that this area has yet to be brought online while staff continue training. “It faces a 20-seat dining area with glass walls in front so that diners can see the chefs at work. The glass walls slide open so that we can move the tables and chairs forward and do cooking demos.”

More From FoodService Director

Menu Development
usa map regions

From global flavors to clean labels, it’s clear that some buzzworthy noncommercial menu trends are universal. But FoodService Director ’s 2016 surveys have revealed some noteworthy differences within segments in the Northeast, South, Midwest and West regions. We combed through data from our College and University Census, Hospital Census and Long-Term Care/Senior Living Census for the most surprising variations in menu trends and expectations.

1. Plant-based dishes are on the rise at Midwestern colleges and universities

Seventy-seven percent of C&U operators in this region say...

Industry News & Opinion

Ithaca College is turning to new solutions to address overcrowding at a dining hall that is already understaffed, The Ithacan reports .

The Ithaca, N.Y., school's Terrace Dining Hall has seen a large influx of students this year after being renovated, causing lines to wrap around the dining hall.

To ease congestion, Sodexo Area General Manager Jeffrey Scott told The Ithacan that the eatery has added a separate entree line, as well as signage displaying menu items at less-crowded food stations in an effort to draw students to the other side of the dining hall.

The...

Menu Development
mac cheese pizza

Anybody think the popularity of mac and cheese has played out? Anyone?

More likely, foodservice directors are trying to bake new life into the comfort staple by tweaking the presentation and components. Here’s a snapshot of how that rejuvenation effort looks in streetside restaurants.

Industry News & Opinion

Noncommercial foodservice operations and other employers would be spared from costly new overtime pay regulations if 21 states succeed in the legal challenge they jointly filed yesterday.

The lawsuit asks the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas to set aside the rules, which are scheduled to take effect on Dec. 1.

If the court rejects the request, restaurants and other businesses will be required after that date to pay overtime to any salaried employee who works more than 40 hours in a week and earns less than $47,476 on an annual basis.

The...

FSD Resources