Argo Tea serves SUNY Buffalo State

Published in FSD C&U Spotlight

Argo Buffalo State opening

Students at SUNY Buffalo State, in Buffalo, N.Y., have a refreshing reason to visit the campus library these days. This spring, the dining services team, managed by Chartwells at Buffalo State, opened a licensed Argo Tea location within the Butler Library on the upstate New York campus—the first Argo Tea location in western New York and the seventh on a college campus. Argo is one of 18 dining operations on campus.

Buffalo State’s previous café concept was inconveniently located in the library, so moving the new café to a more central area was important. And with the move to more digital storage formats in the library, an entire wing of the building was available for transformation into the Argo Tea café. “We’ve transformed library stacks into a beautiful café,” explains Austin Craig, director of catering with Chartwells at Buffalo State. And within the new space, “we’re showing a 12% increase in same store sales from the [previous concept],” he says.

A new, separate entryway provides students with easy access to hot and cold tea-based beverages, snacks and sandwiches. “The big thing that we did is we built an additional entrance off of the library, off of the wing, it goes right off of the parking lot, versus in the past, you’d have to walk all the way around in the snow and ice,” Craig explains. “[It] allows students to come right through and get the nice lovely oatmeal in the morning, or one of the popular teas, like the Hibiscus Tea Sangria, on their way to class.”

Open during library hours to serve the large commuter student population, the new concept is a success according to Jane Calvert, resident dietitian and Argo Tea café manager with Chartwells. “They definitely love the Chai; it’s fantastic. And the Hibiscus Tea Sangria is probably the other most popular. People really love their iced drinks, even in winter. [Guests have] also really enjoyed the chicken sandwiches.”

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

Capital School District in Dover, Del., has a new food truck, one that will serve lunch to students during summer break, Delaware State News reports.

The truck will travel through the district every Monday through Thursday over the break and will offer lunch to anyone 18 and under.

The district offers weekly free lunch at the Capital City Farmers Market during the summer; however, school officials hope that the mobility of the food truck will help reach children who are unable to make it to the market, as well as enable staff to provide food that requires more preparation...

Sponsored Content
organic fruits veggies

From WhiteWave Away from Home.

Organic food has gone mainstream in recent years. And consumers of all ages believe organic food is not just healthier—but tastier—than conventional counterparts, according to Technomic’s 2016 Healthy Eating Consumer Trend Report.

No demographic group, however, values organic offerings as highly as those aged 18 to 34.

Nearly two-thirds (65%) of millennials, compared to 44% overall, say they’re more likely to purchase and willing to pay at least slightly more for menu items with organic claims, according to Technomic’s 2016 Healthy...

Industry News & Opinion

Chefs at Washington State University in Pullman, Wash., participated in plant-based food training earlier this month as part of an effort to introduce more vegetarian, vegan and allergen-free dishes on campus, The Daily Evergreen Reports.

Over two days, chefs worked in pairs with plant-based ingredients to create new dishes such as vegan pizza, cauliflower fried rice and vegetable wellington.

Washington State’s dining services said it hopes to expand the presence of plant-based dishes throughout all campus dining halls as student demand rises, noting that items with animal...

Managing Your Business
food symbols allergens

Bellevue School District in King County, Wash., has reduced the instances of life-threatening allergic reactions by 94% since 2013. Wendy Weyer, business manager for nutrition services, says that success stems from direct communication with the district’s 20,000 students.

Q: What was the first thing you did to start reducing allergic reactions?

A: More than five years ago, we changed our menu signage to provide information to students on what the common allergens were on all the foods that were served at every station. We use symbols such as an egg or a wheat stalk for younger...

FSD Resources