Welcome to the new FoodService Director

After 25 years, FSD gets a facelift.

Twenty-five years ago FoodService Director published its first issue. On this silver anniversary, we’re pleased to unveil the all new FSD.

It’s been six years since this magazine last received a face-lift, and in those years much has changed. Food-related media has skyrocketed. Food trucks took to the streets. Gluten free has replaced sustainability as the industry’s hot topic. Smartphones and tablets grace the hands of even your youngest customers. And, perhaps the biggest influencer of all, the economy crashed.

Non-commercial foodservice has changed, and the pages of this magazine have been redesigned to reflect your changing—and growing—job responsibilities.

Your time is precious. With an ever-increasing to-do list, we understand that you often don’t have an hour or two to peruse the pages of a magazine. With that in mind, we’ve made several significant changes to the way we provide information to you. In the front of the book you’ll find several short stories on each page. These items are designed to give you the information you need to know in an easily digestible format.

Our front-of-book sections include:

  • What You Need to Know: These stories about the news and programs that are shaping the industry will inform you on what’s happening in non-commercial foodservice.
  • Emerging Trends: These are the stories that we think will affect the development of your programs. And because we recognize that there are so many influencers outside of the non-commercial industry, we’ll be sharing ideas from our colleagues in commercial restaurants, c-stores and industry partners on this page.
  • Managing Your Business: You’re being tasked to do more with less. But that doesn’t mean innovation can’t occur. On this page we’ll profile some operations that have found a way to control their costs without stifling creativity.
  • Steal This Idea: One of the carryovers from the previous FSD magazine, this popular page will remain in the new incarnation
Keywords: 
new concepts

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

Denver Public Schools has begun posting cooking videos on its Facebook page in an effort to promote the scratch-made meals served in its cafeterias, Denverite reports.

The video tutorials are set up in a similar way to Buzzfeed’s Tasty videos, showing a pair of hands from above as they prepare a meal to background music. The Colorado district promotes the videos with the hashtag #DPSDelicious.

Read the full story via denverite.com .

Industry News & Opinion

Oregon State University will begin weighing waste in its food halls after receiving a $27,000 grant from the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality’s Materials Management program, the Gazette Times reports.

The school will use the money to install a computer-based system to help keep track of the waste .

Through the system, which includes a scale and a camera, staff will be able to weigh leftover food and take a photo of it before it’s discarded.

After reviewing the data collected, school officials say they may try to reduce portion sizes, alter purchases or...

Sponsored Content
Yuzu

From T. Marzetti® Foodservice.

If the current culinary interest in yuzu is any indication, today’s diners are seeking fresher flavors and cleaner eats. Yuzu, a bumpy, big-seeded citrus fruit, is turning up regularly as a tart and tangy ingredient in appetizers, salad dressings and marinades due to its nutritional benefits and tasty flavor.

Here’s how operators can combine seasonal ingredients such as yuzu with other clean label meal components for an easy way to bring health and flavor to the top of the menu.

Healthy and delicious

It’s no secret that diners want...

Industry News & Opinion

The foodservice program at Lee Public Schools in Lee, Mass., has ended its 2017 fiscal year with a $21,560 surplus, The Berkshire Eagle reports.

The surplus marks a large jump over 2015, when the program closed out the fiscal year with a $10,000 deficit.

Food Service Director Lorrie Goodfellow says the surplus is due to expanding breakfast , buying quality food at lower prices and cutting back on food waste.

"We've increased sales, especially at breakfast, where sales are up 39%. Lunch participation is up about 1%,” Goodfellow said.

Breakfast at the district...

FSD Resources