Welcome to the new FoodService Director

After 25 years, FSD gets a facelift.

Twenty-five years ago FoodService Director published its first issue. On this silver anniversary, we’re pleased to unveil the all new FSD.

It’s been six years since this magazine last received a face-lift, and in those years much has changed. Food-related media has skyrocketed. Food trucks took to the streets. Gluten free has replaced sustainability as the industry’s hot topic. Smartphones and tablets grace the hands of even your youngest customers. And, perhaps the biggest influencer of all, the economy crashed.

Non-commercial foodservice has changed, and the pages of this magazine have been redesigned to reflect your changing—and growing—job responsibilities.

Your time is precious. With an ever-increasing to-do list, we understand that you often don’t have an hour or two to peruse the pages of a magazine. With that in mind, we’ve made several significant changes to the way we provide information to you. In the front of the book you’ll find several short stories on each page. These items are designed to give you the information you need to know in an easily digestible format.

Our front-of-book sections include:

  • What You Need to Know: These stories about the news and programs that are shaping the industry will inform you on what’s happening in non-commercial foodservice.
  • Emerging Trends: These are the stories that we think will affect the development of your programs. And because we recognize that there are so many influencers outside of the non-commercial industry, we’ll be sharing ideas from our colleagues in commercial restaurants, c-stores and industry partners on this page.
  • Managing Your Business: You’re being tasked to do more with less. But that doesn’t mean innovation can’t occur. On this page we’ll profile some operations that have found a way to control their costs without stifling creativity.
  • Steal This Idea: One of the carryovers from the previous FSD magazine, this popular page will remain in the new incarnation
Keywords: 
new concepts

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

Capital School District in Dover, Del., has a new food truck, one that will serve lunch to students during summer break, Delaware State News reports.

The truck will travel through the district every Monday through Thursday over the break and will offer lunch to anyone 18 and under.

The district offers weekly free lunch at the Capital City Farmers Market during the summer; however, school officials hope that the mobility of the food truck will help reach children who are unable to make it to the market, as well as enable staff to provide food that requires more preparation...

Sponsored Content
organic fruits veggies

From WhiteWave Away from Home.

Organic food has gone mainstream in recent years. And consumers of all ages believe organic food is not just healthier—but tastier—than conventional counterparts, according to Technomic’s 2016 Healthy Eating Consumer Trend Report.

No demographic group, however, values organic offerings as highly as those aged 18 to 34.

Nearly two-thirds (65%) of millennials, compared to 44% overall, say they’re more likely to purchase and willing to pay at least slightly more for menu items with organic claims, according to Technomic’s 2016 Healthy...

Industry News & Opinion

Chefs at Washington State University in Pullman, Wash., participated in plant-based food training earlier this month as part of an effort to introduce more vegetarian, vegan and allergen-free dishes on campus, The Daily Evergreen Reports.

Over two days, chefs worked in pairs with plant-based ingredients to create new dishes such as vegan pizza, cauliflower fried rice and vegetable wellington.

Washington State’s dining services said it hopes to expand the presence of plant-based dishes throughout all campus dining halls as student demand rises, noting that items with animal...

Managing Your Business
food symbols allergens

Bellevue School District in King County, Wash., has reduced the instances of life-threatening allergic reactions by 94% since 2013. Wendy Weyer, business manager for nutrition services, says that success stems from direct communication with the district’s 20,000 students.

Q: What was the first thing you did to start reducing allergic reactions?

A: More than five years ago, we changed our menu signage to provide information to students on what the common allergens were on all the foods that were served at every station. We use symbols such as an egg or a wheat stalk for younger...

FSD Resources