New Beginnings

Published in FSD Update

A new website, column and editor highlight FSD's changes for 2014.

It’s January, the time for resolutions. I won’t bore you with mine—mostly because I haven’t made any. But I do want to share with you what’s new with FoodService Director.

On Feb. 1, we launch a new website. The new site will make it easier than ever to stay informed with the latest industry news and trends, steal ideas, develop menus and learn about who’s shaping the industry.

Features of the site will include such online-only content as Recipe Snapshot, where operators can view all the recipes that correspond with the current—and back—issues of the magazine, and the editors’ blogs: Without a (Hair) Net where I share my take on the trends and challenges facing foodservice operators, with the occasional look at the quirkier side of the industry, and Stories from the Road, where Editorial Director Paul King shares his insights and observations from visits with operators.

The website also has a new time-saving feature—the dashboard. The dashboard has four elements: What’s New (recently added content), Industry News and Opinion (news and the editors’ blogs), Managing Your Business (articles that help you do your job better) and Ideas and Innovation (Design Portfolio and Steal This Idea). The dashboard is intended to serve as a menu board of what FSDs need to know. It’s found on the homepage, but it is also featured in the right-hand column of every other page on the site, allowing readers easy access to the stories they will most often want to reference. To see the first edition of On Your Plate, visit our Facebook page.

We’ve also added a new column to the magazine, On Your Plate. A big part of the dining experience is visual—if your Facebook feed is anything like mine, half of it is made up of photos of food. We want to see, and share, the items you’re serving in your operations and the dishes you’re eating when you dine out. So show off your culinary expertise and snap a photo when you create something fun in your operation. Or show us your favorite dish from your hometown haunt. You can find On Your Plate on the last page of the magazine.

One last addition is Megan Warmouth, as associate editor. Megan is no stranger to FSD. In her capacity as custom content editor, Megan has been writing stories for us for the past couple of months. Now, she’s working full time on the FSD staff. Megan will be covering colleges and B&I. So join me in welcoming Megan. You can reach her at mwarmouth@cspnet.com.

Keywords: 
new concepts

More From FoodService Director

Ideas and Innovation
nuts

We decided through focus group feedback that our freshmen struggled with the allergy-friendly options or options for students with diabetes on campus. In response, we decided to have a dinner the first few weeks of classes to let some of these students know what was available and let them network with their peers and others with allergies or diabetes. NC State Dining chefs prepared menu items based on foods from cultures around the world. ... From delicious sliced sweet potatoes to savory Ikarian-style roasted chicken, students were able to sample global dishes free of allergens.

Ideas and Innovation
coffee cups

We started a monthly Coffee Hour with just the department director. The goal is to gather 
staff feedback about their jobs and answer individual questions. After the first event, 
several staff members emailed stating they just wanted to meet with the director without 
their supervisors. Now, the meetings offer an opportunity for more of a one-on-one conversation without the presence of the supervisor they 
deal with day in and day out.

Ideas and Innovation
salad

We’re currently piloting a Salad Bar Happy Hour 
in Cafe 16. Due to Health Department regulations, any self-serve salad bar items must be disposed of after service. The salad bar goes “on sale” for 25 cents an ounce post-lunchtime to help reduce waste as well as offer value to customers.

Menu Development
sauces

Adding an entirely new cuisine to the menu can feel daunting. But what if you could dabble in international flavors simply by introducing a few new condiments? For inspiration, FSD talked to operators who are offering a range of condiments plucked from global regional cuisines.

“Most ethnic cuisines have some sort of sauce or condiment relishes that go with their dishes,” says Roy Sullivan, executive chef with Nutrition & Food Services at UCSF Medical Center in San Francisco. Condiments offered to diners at UCSF Medical include chimichurri (Argentina), curry (India), tzatziki (...

FSD Resources