Tooth of the matter

One member of the House of Representatives sued Restaurant Associates for a broken tooth.

While trolling the Web for news late last week, I came across a story from The Washington Post regarding one-time presidential candidate Dennis Kucinich. The Ohio Democrat, a member of the House of Representatives, had sued Restaurant Associates for $150,000 over a broken tooth.

Restaurant Associates, one of the Compass Group family of contract companies, manages foodservice at the Longworth House Office Building where Kucinich eats lunch. So the story goes, Kucinich bit into a sandwich wrap one day and damaged his tooth on an olive pit. The incident, which occurred three years ago, was recently settled out of court, with terms undisclosed.

This, of course, is every foodservice operator’s nightmare, and the fact that the injured party is a well-known Congressman makes it all the more unfortunate for RA. Now, without knowing the particulars of the incident, such as how soon after the unfortunate bite did Kucinich complain to the cafeteria staff, I can’t say whether Kucinich should have pursued this case.

But later in the week I found a slideshow on the Web site for The New Republic, that attempted to put this suit in perspective. It chronicled nine other times in the past decade when Kucinich either filed suit or threatened to sue one party or another. Included were suits against the publisher of his campaign biography, whom he claimed didn’t release the book in a timely manner and didn’t market it heavily enough, and his own political party, over a “blind loyalty oath.” Both suits were dismissed.

After reviewing that slideshow, I came to the conclusion that the Restaurant Associates suit actually was one of Kucinich’s less frivolous legal actions. And RA does find itself in grand company—since 1999 Kucnich’s lawsuits have included two sitting presidents.

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

The School District of Philadelphia and Baltimore City Public Schools are the latest districts in the Urban School Food Alliance to switch to compostable plates.

The move to the eco-friendlier products will save 19 million polystyrene products from landfills, according to a news release .

Schools often use polystyrene products due to their low cost. Polystyrene trays cost on average around 4 cents apiece, while compostable plates cost an average of 12 cents each. The Urban School Food Alliance’s collective buying power enabled them to create a compostable plate that costs...

Managing Your Business
allergies

Guy Procopio got a taste of the future when Michigan State University hosted a Boy Scout event in 2015. Out of 10,000 participants at the East Lansing, Mich., campus, Procopio, the director of dining services, received 1,400 requests to meet special dietary needs, including a wide spectrum of allergies, gluten intolerance or insensitivity, and other new or unusual hyper-specialized diets.

This dining trend isn’t letting up, at least in America: Food allergies in children increased approximately 50% from 1997 to 2011. They now affect one in 13 children in the United States,...

Industry News & Opinion

Students of Broward County Public Schools in Florida were treated to a special meal by celebrity chef Aria Kagan during lunch last week.

The chef and former contestant on “The Next Food Network Star” prepared her farm-fresh pesto panini in front of students at McNicol Middle School in Hollywood, Fla.

Her visit was part of the district’s Chefs Move to Broward initiative, through which a chef from nonprofit Wellness in the Schools visits district cafeterias each month to prepare a healthy meal. The chef then teaches cafeteria staff how to make the dish so it can be...

Managing Your Business
woman alone in kitchen

In a post-Harvey Weinstein world, there’s an awful anticipation over which star’s worst-kept secret will be outed next. The outpouring of claims of sexual harassment and abuse helped popularize the #MeToo social media campaign, encouraging women to share their stories and spurring allegations against upwards of 60 high-profile men. In October, the movement’s momentum hit the foodservice industry. Since, behemoths such as Mario Batali, John Besh and Todd English were forced to confront accusations of alleged sexual harassment or misconduct.

For many women, the scope of the industry’...

FSD Resources