A sweet career shift

Sad beginnings with happy endings.

Returning to the office Monday after a weekend-long illness, I was desperately seeking some feel-good news. I found it in my e-mail inbox, in the form of a link to an article in last Saturday’s Wall Street Journal.

The write-up was part of a group of articles about executives at Lehman Brothers who lost their jobs when the financial firm went bankrupt a year ago. One of those executives was Sally Saltzbart Minier, who oversaw the foodservice program for the multinational company’s offices in North and South America.

The one-time president of the Society for Foodservice Management has started a new life, as a baker and head of new own little company, Sweet Sally’s Bakeshop. Working out of a kitchen—rent-free, for now—in Whippany, N.J., Sally is pulling 16-hour days recreating baked goods from recipes passed down from her mother and grandmother. She began taking orders last month for her first two specialties, a chocolate rugelach and an item she calls “big apple crackle,” made with matzoh and caramel.

Sally takes only online or wholesale orders to save on the cost of a retail outlet. Telling the WSJ that “food is in my blood,” she expressed no resentment at Lehman for her career shift. Rather, she called it the impetus she needed to do something she had dreamed about but was afraid to act on. I can relate to that; something similar happened to me earlier in my career.

I wasn’t surprised by the article, as Sally had sent me information earlier this year about Sweet Sally’s. Still, it was good to read a story about someone I know turning a negative into a positive, and I hope the media coverage gives her fledgling bakery a boost.

Sally, if you read this, I know we probably won’t see you at the SFM conference later this month in San Francisco, but on the off-chance you do make the trip, could you bring rugelach?

Keywords: 
new concepts

More From FoodService Director

Sponsored Content
vegetables with dip foodservice healthy menu

From Mrs. Dash Foodservice.

There was a time when healthy food meant counting calories, omitting carbs, giving up sugar and going fat-free—in other words, it was all about deprivation.

But not anymore. Today’s definition of healthy means an overall focus on nutrition and wellness that doesn’t mean giving up enjoyment. It’s all about balance: good fats, healthy carbs, better sweeteners, wholesome ingredients and satisfying flavor enhancements. It means food that customers can feel good about, at the same time that they’re enjoying the dining experience.

According to...

Industry News & Opinion

Aramark today announced a partnership with celebrity chef and TV personality Cat Cora that will put a new concept from the Top Chef star in Aramark’s North American business-and-industry accounts.

The new fast-casual concept, called Olilo by Cat Cora, promises a healthy, made-your-way menu, according to the global foodservice provider.

“By bringing together Chef Cora's award-winning brand and healthy cooking advocacy and Aramark's commitment to enriching and nourishing the lives of the thousands of consumers we serve every day, we have an opportunity to elevate the on-site...

Industry News & Opinion

Members of Congress and several advocacy groups gathered on Capitol Hill on Wednesday to highlight the potential loss of millions in state funding because of a Child Nutrition Reauthorization block grant introduced last month, and to call upon legislators to squash the bill.

The Improving Child Nutrition and Education Act of 2016 houses a statute that would provide three unannounced pilot states with block grant funding. Participating states would be exempt from federal nutrition regulations and would no longer qualify for the 6-cent reimbursement per lunch garnered by certified...

Managing Your Business
90 balloons

A cheat sheet for a new employee’s first 90 days

Organization orientation Assign a mentor Create a 90-day plan with time frames Check in with the staff member and mentor periodically Celebrate the new hire’s successes as a team Don’t forget the person after 90 days

FSD Resources