Student becomes the teacher

Eat’n Park's Jamie Moore leads presenters at Farming for the Future conference.

Next week, when more than 2,000 farmers, food processors, students, environmentalists business people and chefs gather at Penn State University for the 21st annual Farming for the Future conference, one of the presenters will be one of our industry’s most ardent supporters of sustainability.

Jamie Moore, the director of sustainability for the Eat’n Park Hospitality Group, based in Pittsburgh, will lead a team of chefs who will present on various topics associated with sustainability and the foodservice industry. Contract management firms Parkhurst Dining Services and Cura Hospitality are part of the Eat’n Park family.

In pre-conference seminars Jan, 31 and Feb. 1, Moore will instruct a class on how to read and understand new food labels, as well as a session on the differences between raw, pasteurized and ultra-pasteurized milk. Mike Passanita, executive sous chef at St. Francis University in Loretto, Pa., will talk about partnering and building relationships with local farmers. Mike Galterio, Eat’n Park’s food code specialist, will explain how to create HACCP guidelines when using home- or locally grown products. The conference itself takes place Feb. 1-4.

Moore is a member of the board of directors of the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture, the organization that stages the conference. Last year, Moore conducted some training sessions for Parkhurst chefs in conjunction with the conference, and the buzz surrounding the sessions was such that PASA decided to expand Moore’s influence and open the sessions to more attendees.

Moore has been a passionate student of sustainability and the local movement, and his efforts have influenced much of what Eat’n Park does in its own restaurants, in addition to the efforts made by Parkhurst and Cura. Now, he is sharing the knowledge he’s gained with others. Later this week, in a web-only article, I will share with readers Moore’s philosophy and why this conference is so important.

Keywords: 
sustainability

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