How healthy is your operation?

FoodService Director is looking for the healthiest institutions and companies in the nation.

Usually, I use my blog to chronicle my travels around the country and relate what I’ve learned as I visit readers and see their operations. But I digress this time for a couple of reasons. First, the winter has not been kind to my travel schedule. Second, I wanted to call readers’ attention to an important search we’re engaged in.

We are looking for the healthiest foodservice operations in the country. Which operators have the healthiest foodservice programs for their guests and their own employees? Who features the healthiest menus? Who does the best job of promulgating nutrition information? Who does the best job of promoting a healthier lifestyle, through social media, incentive programs and the like? Who seems to have the best handle on what will get their customers to eat more healthfully?

Obviously, we need your help. We’d like you to identify who in non-commercial foodservice does the best job at meeting these criteria. In short, who do you recommend operators turn to when they ask to see the best examples of healthful dining? And this is no time to be shy; you may be the institution or company that does a stellar job when it comes to wellness.

In our June issue we are going to reveal the companies and institutions we believe are the healthiest foodservice programs in the country. It will be the 2014 version of our much talked-about list of the 20 most influential people in non-commercial foodservice, which we released in mid-2012.

We already received quite a few nominations, and we ourselves know of even more. But you know better than any of us who among your peers should be saluted. So tell us who they are. Send your nominations to me at Just include the name of the facility and the foodservice director, along with a short essay about why this facility fits the bill.

Time is running short. Please submit your suggestions to me by April 1 for consideration. Then watch this space for an advance announcement of who will be featured in the June issue.


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