The FDA’s New Nutrition Labels Might Actually Help You Eat Right

The FDA has proposed a new design for the Nutrition Facts labels that come on all the food we eat and—they’re way, way better than before.

It’s the first time in 20 years that the labels have received a refresh, and they’re designed to align better with the way Americans eat today. The result is a label, on the right, that draws more attention to some key statistics.

The most obvious change is that calorie count is now impossible to miss, which is great for people keen to quickly gain a handle on the contents of a pack. Calorie count isn’t the only metric to consider when buying food, sure, but it’s a great yardstick by which to measure what you put into your face.

Elsewhere, the servings per container line is enlarged—to make people more aware of just what quantity that calorie count refers to—and an added sugars section added, due its role as one of the leading causes of obesity in the U.S.. The methodology behind serving sizes has also changed, so a 20 oz bottle of soda now counts as one serving, not 2.5—a healthy dose of realism, then. Finally, the daily value column has also been switched around, to make it more readable.

All in, that makes for a far clearer—and more useful—nutrition label. The hope is that the change would encourage food manufacturers to make their products more healthy. If that succeeds, it could, the FDA suggests, save $30 billion in health benefits long-term, and that compares pretty well with the $2 billion that the transition would cost to undertake.

Now, they just need to be approved by powers that be at the FDA. If that happens, it could make life at the shops far, far easier for all of us. [New York Times via Verge]

More From FoodService Director

Ideas and Innovation
soup sandwich

Aside from Black Friday shoppers, there may be no crowd of people more eager to get to their bounty than wedding guests headed for the passed appetizers. While they’re surely thrilled for the bride and groom, that feeling comes second to the thrill of landing that first shrimp skewer—especially after a long ceremony. Same goes for work-related cocktail parties. Caught up in an awkward conversation? Oh look, it’s the mini-grilled cheese guy!

This month, FoodService Director takes a deep dive into catering, from the latest and greatest in menus to starting a new program at your...

Ideas and Innovation
shrimp lemon

In an interview with Bon Appetit magazine, Victor Clay, a line cook at Nobu Dallas in Texas, reveals his two simple tricks to prep an average of 15 to 20 shrimp per minute.

First, use kitchen shears to split the back of the shrimp. Then, before removing the vein, run the shrimp under cold water, which will loosen the vein. This cuts down on cleaning time, and prevents cooks from having to soak and rinse the shrimp afterward.

Menu Development
beau rivage resort blended burger

Stealth health is so 1998. When author Evelyn Tribole’s original book on sneaking healthy add-ons into meals was published nearly 20 years ago, there may have been a genuine nutrition need to fill. But as today’s diners are increasingly requesting more produce at the center of the plate, another need has taken the lead: a desire for creativity. Here’s how operators are openly blending meat with other ingredients—or eliminating animal products entirely—to take protein to another level.

In April, dining halls at Yale University in New Haven, Conn., began offering the Beyond Burger, a...

Ideas and Innovation
desserts plate

We’re knocking down a wall in our bar area, which will create a more inviting atmosphere and allow us to host a coffee and dessert bar in the space on off nights when the bar is closed.

FSD Resources