WFF announces new executive committee, hands out awards at annual conference

April 14—The new executive committee for the Women’s Foodservice Forum were announced at the association’s 2011 national conference, which was held in Orlando earlier this week.

“Our leadership team represents influential and proven experts, with proven track records of success,” Carin Stutz, Chair, WFF, said in a press release. “We’re thrilled to advance our organization with the guidance and oversight of this incredible team.”

The executive committee members are: Carin Stutz, president of global business development for Brinker International, as chair; Lorna Donatone, COO and education market president for Sodexo, as chair-elect; Laurie Burns, president of Bahama Breeze Island Grille, as vice-chair; John Buckles, executive vice president of sales and marketing for Venture Foods LLC, as secretary; Julie Swan, vice president of finance for specialty business for Sysco Corporation, as treasurer; Hattie Hill, CEO of Hattie Hill Enterprises, Inc., as member-at-large; Angela Hornsby, vice president of human resources for Applebee’s Services Inc., as member-at-large; Susan Gambardella, senior vice president for integrated marketing for Coca-Cola North America, as member-at-large; and Doug Barber, executive vice president and chief people officer for Cracker Barrel Old Country Store, Inc., as member-at-large.

Several awards also were handed out at the conference. Among the winners were Hattie Hill, of Hattie Hill Enterprises, who won the Outstanding Board Service award; Darden restaurants, which won The Jackie B Trujillo Soar award, which recognizes gender diversity; and Michelle Varian, who was named Volunteer of the Year.

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