West Virginia schools receive $1.1 million to implement alternative breakfast service

The funding is the first step in the state's Feed to Achieve Act, which aims to provide free meals to all students by 2015.

Aug. 14—Some West Virginia students will see the Feed to Achieve Act in action when they return to school after summer break and reach for breakfast.

By the end of the month, $1.1 million in grants will have been distributed to all of the state's school districts to help roll out alternative breakfast strategies, which is the first phase of the statewide childhood hunger law passed in April.

"I think we're the only state that has state law that mandates breakfast, which is one of the best things to get on a nutrition program in decades," said Rick Goff, executive director of the Office of Child Nutrition at the state Department of Education.