Walmart on Campus Opens at Georgia Tech

Retail giant debuts third small-format college store.

Aug. 19—Wal-Mart Stores Inc. has opened its third Walmart on Campus store on Aug. 14. The new small-format location is on the campus of the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, in Georgia Tech's "Technology Square" in the space formerly occupied by a restaurant.

The first Walmart on Campus opened at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville in January 2011, and the second at Arizona State University in May 2013.

The Walmart on Campus format offers quick and convenient shopping, with health and wellness services, general convenience items and merchandise tailored to the campus, at Walmart's "everyday low prices."

"With our smaller format and being located right on campus, our store is perfect for those who need to pick up a prescription or something for a quick meal," said store manager Stacy Khorana. "Our customers will be able to find what they need quickly and easily and then head on back to class."

The pharmacy offers a full range of products and services. Pharmacy team members can answer product and prescription questions and offer health and wellness solutions. The pharmacy will serve most insurance plans and features Walmart's signature $4 generic prescription program.

The 2,500-square-foot store is part of a pilot program designed to provide Georgia Tech students and faculty, as well as the surrounding neighborhood, more convenient access to affordable products. It employs approximately 10 associates. It is open Monday through Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. and Sunday 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

"We were looking for something that was a nonrestaurant replacement when Ribs-n-Blues closed," said Rich Steele, senior director of auxiliary services in a press release.

"Walmart pharmacy was a good connection with Georgia Tech--the CEO of Walmart had been on campus speaking in 2010. In 2011, we started conversations with Walmart about the idea of placing their new concept somewhere at Tech," Steele said.

The grand-opening celebration included presentations of $2,500 in grants from Walmart and the Walmart Foundation to local community groups.

"I am delighted that Georgia Tech is bringing this unique Walmart concept to its Midtown campus," said Atlanta City Councilmember Kwanza Hall. "Tech students and their in-town neighbors are hungry for new shopping options that fit their budgets and lifestyles and respect the urban fabric of this dynamic part of the city."

Bentonville, Ark.-based Wal-Mart Stores currently operates approximately 3,100 Supercenter locations, about 250 Walmart Neighborhood Markets, 17 Walmart Express stores and three Walmart on Campus stores.

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