Twitter employees to dine in cabins

Two century-old cabins were hauled from Montana to Vallejo, Calif., for Twitter employees to dine in.

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.—The tech world is lousy with impressive employee perks, but this is certainly a unique entry in the category: Twitter employees will soon be able to eat lunch in one of two century-old Montana log cabins. As the San Francisco Chronicle explains, the cabins were taken apart and shipped this week to Vallejo, Calif., where they're being "refurbished and re-sized" in advance of their installation in Twitter's new San Francisco headquarters. Designer Olle Lundberg, whose firm is handling the project, explained that "we've always had this sort of notion of the forest being a source of inspiration for design at Twitter," and the forest connection provided a "nice story."

But it was the awkwardness of the new dining area that led to the decision. "The problem is all the floors are 10-foot ceilings," explains Lundberg. "That’s really a miserable space. How do you subdivide the space without making it a series of rooms?" Enter the 20-foot by 20-foot log cabins, which were purchased for an undisclosed price and will be erected without any roofs and with 7-foot-wide entrances on each of their four sides; booths will be built in. It's not the only perk workers in the new office will have access to, per the Marin Independent Journal. Among the others: a yoga studio, arcade, and rooftop garden.

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