Six food facts to know about San Francisco tech company cafeterias

Brisket burgers, housemade condiments and pedal-powered grain mills are some of the things found in foodservice departments in Silicon Valley cafeterias.

SAN FRANCISCO—On Sunday, the Chronicle Food + Home section ran a little story about how chefs at various tech companies are trying to foster a certain culture within their workplaces. Today, local freelance contributor Alissa Merksamer shares a few fun facts that didn’t make it into the story. Consider them bonuses from the director’s cut.

  1. Dropbox chef Brian Mattingly has an ego befitting a man who formerly worked for Michelin-starred restaurants and headed culinary programs at Apple and Google. He spent months perfecting the burger he serves daily at his Dropbox cafe, Tuck Shop, eventually settling on a blend of brisket, chuck and jowls. He believes the work has paid off. “Our burgers are the best in America,” he says.
  2. In fact, Tuck Shop briefly appeared on Yelp and garnered such high ratings from Dropbox employees that one night, a group of prospective diners arrived from San Jose thinking it was a real restaurant. Mattingly was so embarrassed that he gave them $100 to find dinner elsewhere.

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