Sebasticook Valley Hospital first to implement Guiding Stars

Aug. 11—The 25-bed Sebasticook Valley Hospital in Pittsfield, Maine, is the first hospital to implement the Guiding Stars program.

Guiding Stars is a nutrition guidance program that helps customers make educated dining decisions. The program can be found in 1,500 grocery stores, as well as on K-12 school and college campuses. Under the program, prepared meals, snacks and grab-and-go items in the hospital’s cafeteria are rated according to their nutritional value. Each item is rated on a scale of stars—zero to three, with three being the best nutritional value. The system is designed to provide customers with an at-a-glance nutritional summary.

“We’re looking to make nutritious choices even easier and are thrilled to bring this program to guests and staff in a healthcare facility for the first time,” said John Eldredge, director of brand and business development at Guiding Stars Licensing Company. “In an environment where achieving better health and well-being is so important, Guiding Stars is a natural fit for the hospital’s food service program. We’re committed to having healthy food choices be a part of the broader public health environment.”

 “At SVH, our community’s health is a priority, and Guiding Stars is an opportunity to educate and empower our patients, guests and employees to make more nutritious food choices,” said Victoria Alexander-Lane, president and CEO of Sebasticook Valley Hospital. “Because this program is already familiar to most food shoppers, we are pleased we can offer this easy-to-use guidance program in our hospital. It’s just one more milestone in offering the best possible service for our community.”

The Guiding Starts program rates food items based on the presence of vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber and whole grains. Trans fat, saturated fats, cholesterol, added sugars and sodium negatively affect an item’s ranking.

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

Capital School District in Dover, Del., has a new food truck, one that will serve lunch to students during summer break, Delaware State News reports.

The truck will travel through the district every Monday through Thursday over the break and will offer lunch to anyone 18 and under.

The district offers weekly free lunch at the Capital City Farmers Market during the summer; however, school officials hope that the mobility of the food truck will help reach children who are unable to make it to the market, as well as enable staff to provide food that requires more preparation...

Sponsored Content
organic fruits veggies

From WhiteWave Away from Home.

Organic food has gone mainstream in recent years. And consumers of all ages believe organic food is not just healthier—but tastier—than conventional counterparts, according to Technomic’s 2016 Healthy Eating Consumer Trend Report.

No demographic group, however, values organic offerings as highly as those aged 18 to 34.

Nearly two-thirds (65%) of millennials, compared to 44% overall, say they’re more likely to purchase and willing to pay at least slightly more for menu items with organic claims, according to Technomic’s 2016 Healthy...

Industry News & Opinion

Chefs at Washington State University in Pullman, Wash., participated in plant-based food training earlier this month as part of an effort to introduce more vegetarian, vegan and allergen-free dishes on campus, The Daily Evergreen Reports.

Over two days, chefs worked in pairs with plant-based ingredients to create new dishes such as vegan pizza, cauliflower fried rice and vegetable wellington.

Washington State’s dining services said it hopes to expand the presence of plant-based dishes throughout all campus dining halls as student demand rises, noting that items with animal...

Ideas and Innovation
phone bed call sick

We make people call and directly talk to their boss or supervisor if they are reporting an absence for a shift. While it is more cumbersome, it is a conscious decision. We have adapted and implemented electronic methods to obtain efficiencies in just about every other functional area, except for electronic absence reporting systems. The direct supervisor can put more pressure on an employee to show up—especially those with some form of the “Super Bowl plague”—than any electronic system can.

FSD Resources