Retirement community shows off culinary chops with special event

Legacy Retirement Communities holds its annual Chef Fest to showcase food served to residents.

LINCOLN, Neb.—Imagine sampling delicacies such as beef tenderloin Bruschetta, shrimp and scallops in garlic wine sauce, smoked salmon, bacon-wrapped chestnuts, and bananas foster.

These mouth-watering treats and many more are on the menu for Chef Fest 2014, a wildly-popular signature event hosted by Legacy Retirement Communities. The seventh annual event is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday (Aug. 5) at Legacy Estates, 7200 Van Dorn St.

Five-star dining isn't always synonymous with retirement communities, but those who attend the special, complimentary events hosted by Legacy Retirement Communities will attest to the quality and creativity proudly presented by more than 60 members of all three Legacy Retirement Communities' Dining Services team who come together to stage the event.

What may surprise you is that the delicacies served Tuesday at Chef Fest are part of the bill of fare enjoyed throughout the year by residents of all three Legacy Retirement Communities.

"Chef Fest is an opportunity to share with the public the finer aspects of retirement living," says Robert Darrah, Director of Dining Services for Legacy Retirement Communities.

They not only take food preparation and presentation seriously at LRC, they invest in education and training. Chefs at all three communities possess Certified Healthcare Chef credentials, resulting from successful completion of year-long, on-site training and testing through a partnership with Don Miller & Associates.

"We are their only client in the Midwest whose chefs possess this coveted designation," said Darrah. "Those who successfully complete this training are held to a higher accountability."

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