Program funds healthy changes in school meals

Time Life Foundation expanding its assistance to additional cities.

As part of its mission to improve children’s nutrition Life Time Fitness has announced it will expand its program designed to inspire healthier food in our nation’s schools to Chicago, Dallas, New York and Phoenix. Led by the Life Time Foundation, the program focuses on removing 100% of bleached flour, processed sugar, food coloring, high fructose corn syrup, preservatives, trans fats and hormones from the school lunch menu.

Prompted by the success of its first year pilot program with Deephaven Elementary, which is part of the Minnetonka, Minn. Public Schools District 276, Life Time’s school lunch program expansion invites additional opportunities for schools to collaborate in partnership with the company’s health and nutrition experts in the design of new lunch menus that will launch in the 2012-13 school year. As with Deephaven Elementary, the effort will result in eliminating the key ingredients Life Time’s experts believe contribute to many health problems in youth today. Additionally, the Life Time Foundation has committed to fund 100% of the cost difference between the former and newly designed lunch menus for a period of three years.

“The positive impact of our initial pilot and the sustained interest we have seen by other schools and parents reinforce our desire to expand the program,” said James McGuire, director, Life Time Foundation. “In doing so, we will bring this opportunity to four additional schools, with the goal of providing a school lunch that is far healthier. At the same time, we welcome other companies like ours to embrace this model, which we are happy to provide, such that dozens more schools, students and staff may be positively impacted by attacking the nutrition issues children face. We also know that as better food choices are made, the cost of these improved ingredients will reduce over time, making it possible for the schools themselves to make this change.”

More From FoodService Director

Ideas and Innovation
business pamphlet fair show

As we struggle to recruit and retain millennials, we had our current millennial employees invite friends who don’t work for our organization to a Q&A session where we find out why our organization is or isn’t appealing to them, and what they are looking for in an employer. I recommend doing this off-site in a casual environment so you can get honest and open feedback that could be useful for better marketing.

Menu Development
sweet pea ravioli

On any given night at the Wake Robin senior living facility in Shelburne, Vt., residents may find spring sweet pea and mascarpone ravioli with white wine cream sauce or acorn squash stuffed with quinoa and cranberries on the menu. These dishes, along with a new sweet-potato burger topped with cilantro aioli, aren’t just delicious, says Director of Dining Services Kathy King. They’re also completely vegetarian.

The popularity of Meatless Mondays and the growing number of people who call themselves “flexitarians” have impacted menu development in every noncommercial sector. Although...

Managing Your Business
umass amherst food

Restaurateurs in Amherst, Mass., aren’t happy with UMass Dining .

Registered dietitian Dianne Sutherland told local NBC affiliate WWLP News in May that the high quality of food served on campus means students aren’t visiting neighborhood eateries as frequently as those businesses might like.

“Even our vendors who we work with, they get complaints from the restaurants that students are staying on campus,” she said. “They are already paying for the food; why should they [go] off campus to eat?” More than 19,000 Amherst students are on a meal plan—6,000 of whom live off campus...

Ideas and Innovation
lettuce eat dining

Forced to battle crumbling infrastructure and a constant churn of trends, sometimes the best way to save a foodservice operation is to change it entirely. As Steve Mangan, director of dining at the University of Michigan, puts it, “At some point when your building starts to fail, the cost of maintenance stands out.” But for operators with limited budgets, the challenge is discerning the right time to do so—and how far to take it.

At Jefferson High School, change came because little worked anymore. The Cedar Rapids, Iowa, school’s cafeteria hadn’t been updated since 1957; students...

FSD Resources