Nonprofit launches campaign for healthy school meals in Colo.

Grant from private donor helped to spur campaign.

June 14—LiveWell Colorado, a nonprofit dedicated to preventing obesity through healthy eating and active living, has announced it will expand its current school food initiative to ensure all children in Colorado have access to healthy food at school by 2022.

To help launch this goal, LiveWell has received a $1 million personal gift from Rob Katz, CEO of Vail Resorts, and his wife Elana Amsterdam. The gift was given to LiveWell Colorado to support this campaign, an initiative unprecedented anywhere in the country.

As part of its mission to create sustainable healthy changes, LiveWell Colorado has worked with school districts throughout Colorado for the past two years to improve nutrition staff skills, knowledge and facilities to provide healthier student fare, in addition to creating programs that educate and engage students to make better choices.

"This is a transformative gift not only for LiveWell Colorado, but for all Colorado children who deserve the opportunity to eat wholesome food at school and learn healthy habits that will last a lifetime," Maren Stewart, president and CEO of LiveWell Colorado, said in a press release. "Rob and Elana have shown great leadership in supporting the health of the next generation through this gift, and we hope it inspires other large donors to take part in this important undertaking."

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