NC hospitals compete in culinary challenge

FoodService Director - news - NC hospitals compete in culinary challengeNOV. 3—A team of foodservice employees from UNC/Rex Hospitals in Chapel Hill, N.C., were awarded first place in Cut to the Core, a healthy culinary competition sanctioned by the American Culinary Federation. Seven teams from North Carolina hospital foodservice departments competed in the event, which was held at Johnson & Wales University in Charlotte, N.C., on Oct. 29.

Cut to the Core highlighted ways in which North Carolina hospitals have promoted healthy eating in their facilities, according to NC Prevention Partners (NCPP), a nonprofit helping reduce preventable illness in the state. NCPP’s red apple designation is given to hospitals that have shown a commitment to creating healthy food environments for employees and visitors. Seventy-eight hospitals in North Carolina have been given the designation.

Each of the seven teams created a three-course meal for Cut to the Core. The criteria for the event was to create a menu that was healthy, delicious and affordable. The winning menu from UNC/Rex Hospitals was a Deconstructed Autumn Roll (braised beef machaca, avocado, fresh mango and baby greens garnished with a fried rice wrapper); fennel dusted shrimp with roasted tomato jus, zucchini enrobed quinoa, butternut squash succotash and an herbed pumpkin seed pesto; and a Neapolitan dessert sampler with strawberry yogurt mousse and low-fat cookies. The team included Ryan Conklin, Shawn Dolan, Jim McGrody and Angelo Mojica. Food Network chef Alton Brown presented the award to the Black Hat Chefs team from UNC/Rex Hospitals.

“The months of work in improving menus, changing recipes and focusing on healthy, delicious food was really evident in the energy and excitement each of these teams brought to the competition,” Anne Thornhill, NCPP senior manager for business development, said in a press release. “The chefs and their teams have clearly demonstrated how we can create healthy food environments while preparing food that is beautiful and delicious.”

Other teams to compete were, in order of finish: Pitt County Memorial Hospital (Aramark); Duke University, Duke Raleigh and High Point Regional Hospitals (Aramark); Forsyth, Wesley Long, New Hanover Regional and Cape Fear Hospitals (Sodexo); Duplin Memorial Hospital; Gaston Memorial Hospital, Inc. (Morrison); and Haywood Regional Medical Center.

 

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

The University of Maryland will begin offering weekly specials at all of its dining halls this semester, The Diamond Back reports.

The weekday specials will allow Dining Services to offer past menu items that students miss as well as new dishes students have been requesting, according to a spokesperson.

Students can find out which specials are being offered each week via dining hall table tents as well as through Dining Services’ social media. During select weeks, the specials may reflect a particular theme, such as Taste of the South.

Read the full story via...

Ideas and Innovation
coal creek student salad bar

When I was visiting Minneapolis Public Schools, I saw that they have these cool signs on top of their salad bars. As soon as we got back, we re-created them. They are big and branded, and have the portion requirements. They say “Taste something new today” on one side, and we support our local farmers on the other. They help the bars look fresh and delish, and attract students’ eyes.

Menu Development
chicken tetrazzini bowl

The No Whey station in the main dining hall at Georgia Southern University in Statesboro, Ga., offers students meals that are free of the eight most common allergens. When Brittany Parham, the dietitian who oversees the station, polled food-sensitive students on which favorites they missed most, “comfort foods” was the overwhelming response. Parham, who herself has food allergies, worked with chefs on the 20,000-student campus to focus on allergen-free versions of pasta bakes, biscuits, banana bread and other down-home dishes. Recently, the chefs reworked the school’s traditional chicken...

Ideas and Innovation
university chicago medical center renovation workers

As The University of Chicago Medical Center prepared for the revamp of one of its kitchens to feed an additional 202 patients, it wasn’t just foodservice executives coming to the table to make decisions. The process, which began in fall 2014, involved hourly employees from the ground up, says Daryl Wilkerson, vice president of support services. “They actually helped build this [kitchen], which is why I think this is so spectacular,” he says. “Normally what you’ll get in a lot of projects is senior people sitting around in shirts and ties making decisions.”

The hospital follows the...

FSD Resources