Minnesota high school opts out of federal lunch program

Eighty percent of Wayzata High School students participate in an activity and school officials believe 750-850 calories is not enough to keep students energized.

PLYMOUTH, Minn.—Starting in the fall, a west metro high school will no longer be part of the national school lunch program.

The program has calorie guidelines and requires that every student has a vegetable or piece of fruit on their tray.

Eighty percent of kids at Wayzata High School do some sort of activity. Many of the kids do a number of activities. They are burning a ton of calories, and 750-850 is not enough to power them through their long day, according to school officials.

"You can imagine we have such activity levels here that that's been really challenging for the students to get enough food," said Mary Anderson, Director of Culinary Express at the high school.