McLane Appoints Scott Siers as VP of Business Development

Carrollton, Texas – McLane today announced the appointment of Scott Siers as Vice President of Business Development. McLane is a $30 billion supply chain services leader, providing grocery and foodservice supply chain solutions for thousands of convenience stores, mass merchants, drug stores and military locations, as well as thousands of chain restaurants throughout the United States.

Scott’s primary objective at McLane will be sales growth, concentrating on a development plan that supports the company’s vision of doubling foodservice sales over the next five years.

Scott comes to McLane with more than 23 years of experience in sales development and marketing within the foodservice industry. Much of Scott’s career has been with PepsiCo, where he held key roles in brand positioning, business development and general management. Most recently, as Vice President of Industry Relations and Business Development, Scott led sales and marketing activities for all PepsiCo brands within the restaurant and hospitality industry.

“Considering Scott’s track record in developing new business prospects, we feel he has the vision and entrepreneurial skills to help exceed our objectives in growing the business,” said Susan Adzick, McLane’s VP of Sales and Marketing.

Scott currently serves on the Executive Committee and Board of Directors for the Society for Foodservice Management and The Restaurant Leadership Advisory Board. He has been the recipient of the International Foodservice Manufacturer Association’s President’s and Key Person Awards. Most recently received the Society for Foodservice Management’s 2009 Robert Pacifico Above and Beyond Award. Scott also gives his time to the Culinary Institute of America, where he is member of their Society of Fellows. Scott is a graduate of Western Kentucky University.

“Joining McLane gives me a great opportunity to leverage long-term relationships I’ve developed across a variety of key industry groups, while creating new ones that coincide with McLane’s strategic objectives, said Siers. “I look forward to working with the McLane team and developing the business.”

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