Mass. schools say meal regs to blame for $34,000 deficit

The previous year the program had a $2,200 surplus.

April 1—The federal government's mission to combat childhood obesity starting this school year has meant some students in Tyngsborough (Mass.) Public Schools aren't buying the healthier lunches.

Superintendent of Schools Don Ciampa told local state legislators at a recent selectmen's meeting that Tyngsboro's lunch program had a $34,000 deficit as of December, whereas the previous year the program had a $2,200 surplus.

"We have seen a change in the eating habits of students. Some students choose not to eat. They'll choose not to eat rather than eat the school lunch because they don't like the portions or requirements," Ciampa said.