Healthy lunches don't cost more, study finds

Schools offering healthier meals saw an average profit of $3.5 million over the three-year study.

Aug. 23—In 2006, three middle schools in the San Antonio ISD made some radical lunchtime changes such as taking french fries off the menu and cheese off the burgers, and adding baby carrot sticks and more whole grains. Even the breading on chicken nuggets got the whole grain treatment.

The result?

According to a national study that included the three schools, providing healthier school meals doesn't have to cost more.Those were the latest findings from a San Antonio-led national study of 42 middle schools across the country that two years ago found better cafeteria offerings and improved physical education could reduce obesity rates for children at highest risk of diabetes.