CIA and Vassar Brothers Hospital partner to improve hospital food

Elective course focuses on healthcare foodservice.

March 13—Students at the Culinary Institute of America are learning how to cook for medical communities, like hospitals, nursing homes and senior housing as part of an elective class at the CIA.

"So we're looking at the best way to deliver that food; how to maintain the chemical values of that food so that it reaches the patient in the best quality than it can possibly be" explains Culinary Institute professor, Lynn Eddy.

The students taking the class already have an appetite for changing the status quo of institutional cooking. Just ask Emily Li, a senior at the Culinary Institute.

"I think you can actually get someone to actually want to eat the food at the hospital because every time I was at the hospital I didn't like anything at all,"

That's why Li is eager to soak up lessons from Anthony Fischetti, the executive chef at Vassar Brother's Hospital.

"We have room service which is just like an a la cart restaurant service."

Fischetti has worked at some of the top restaurants in the country an he brings the same prescription for fine dining to the hospital. The emphasis is on fresh.

"The key is fresh food, using fresh herbs."

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