Association of Nutrition & Foodservice Professionals names CEO

Joyce Gilbert to replace Bill St. John, who retires May 31.

Feb. 25—The Association of Nutrition & Foodservice Professionals has chosen Joyce Gilbert, Ph.D., R.D., as its new president and CEO.  Dr. Gilbert replaces Bill St. John, who retires May 31.

According to ANFP, Gilbert has vast experience as a chief executive, fundraiser, clinician, and instructor for a variety of organizations. She has served for the past five years as executive director of the Marilyn Magaram Center, a non-profit foundation based at California State University, Northridge, that focuses on research and education in food and nutrition. In that position she has directed fundraising programs that have generated more than $6.1 million. 

From 1995 to 2001, Gilbert worked for Compass Group North America after selling her consulting practice to the contract food management firm. Gilbert’s own nutrition consulting company provided expertise in regulatory compliance to the long-term healthcare industry, and nutrition consultancy services to women, athletes, and healthcare continuing education providers.

Gilbert earned her bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of South Carolina, her master’s in human nutrition from Clemson University, and her doctorate in food science and human nutrition from the University of Florida. She is an active member of many professional associations, among them the American Society of Nutrition, the Institute of Food Technology, and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, along with several of their practice groups. 

Gilbert is a published author on several topics, including nutrition and diet therapy, CMS regulations, sports nutrition, ideal weight, and many more. 

“The [certified dietary manager] is the cornerstone of the dietetics profession,” Gilbert said in a statement from ANFP. “Together we will continue to build the value of the CDM credential through empowering our members. I am both honored and excited about our future and my service to this incredible association.”

More From FoodService Director

Ideas and Innovation
to-go coffee

We have a fixed kiosk that not only sells coffee, but also protein smoothies, grab-and-go reimbursable meals and other a la carte items. We used updated equipment like what is used in Starbucks and incorporated school colors. It is a very popular addition to one of our high schools, and we are planning on expanding it to two additional high schools.

Menu Development
sam kass talking menu directions

Sam Kass, former White House senior policy advisor for nutrition policy and executive director of the Let’s Move campaign, spoke at FSD’s MenuDirections conference in February.

Q: What’s one of the biggest food-related problems facing our country?

A: Obesity is the No. 1 threat to national security—20% of what we’re spending on healthcare is due to obesity. This isn’t a policy problem. The root of our challenge is culture, and what we value in our food. The healthy choice needs to be the easy choice.

Q: What are some important steps to modeling healthy eating and creating...
Menu Development
three sisters salad

“Everyone is doing Thai in college dining,” says Patrick McElroy, campus executive chef for Bon Appetit at Washington University in St. Louis. So he set out to “push the envelope” on ethnic cuisine and offer Native American dishes—a move that had support from the American Indian Student Association. But McElroy didn’t realize the challenge ahead. “I wanted to maintain the integrity and tradition of the food, but there were very few recipes,” he says. “I had to do a lot of research.” To develop the menu, he enlisted the help of chef Nephi Craig, founder of the Native American Culinary...

Managing Your Business
dancing fruit happy

When editor Jill Failla and I sat down to discuss ideas for this month’s cover story, data from FoodService Director’s sister company Technomic was the spark that lit the flame of conversation. She told me the most recent Healthy Eating Consumer Trend Report had found that consumers are more willing to order and pay more for items they think are both healthy and tasteful. My questions: OK, what does that look like in practice? How does it factor into operators’ decision-making processes? And what the heck do we call that phenomenon?

After tossing around some ideas, we had it: the...

FSD Resources