Fourth Annual "The Best"

Fourth Annual "The Best"

Health and Wellness

Best-selling healthy retail item
Right now, dips are doing really well for us. From housemade dips in all kinds of varieties to prepackaged hummus with pretzel crisps, our customers just can’t get enough picnic-type foods at all of our retail locations. Right now, we have edamame hummus, garlic hummus, sun-dried tomato and white bean spread, roasted red pepper hummus, guacamole and even a spicy guacamole hummus.

We also started selling more packaged cut fruit and even cheese snacks. Some of our top sellers are the cheddar cheese and grape snack or the apples and cheese snack, and we even offer tiny wheels of Brie, which are individually packaged for the grab-and-go case.
—Maya Vincelli, assistant director of retail operations, University of Richmond, Virginia

Best stealth health menu item we have
Soup. You can add many healthy items like lentils, beans, fresh vegetables, etc.
—Bill Notte, director, nutrition & dietetics, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia

We use local zucchini and butternut squash in two of our muffin recipes. The zucchini is actually available all year since we process and freeze it during the summer. Butternut squash is relatively new on our menus and we have identified a processor that can process it so that it is available all year.
—Julia Bauscher, director, school and community nutrition services, Jefferson County Public Schools, Louisville, Ky.

Best wellness promotion we’ve done
Real Easy Wellness @ Microsoft: Dining at Microsoft partnered with MSHR (human resources) to develop a comprehensive wellness labeling system that can be used to enable customers to make informed health decisions. Real easy is not a diet plan but a guide. The nutritional labeling system, with a color-code key, is adapted from the Healthy Eating Plate created by the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School. Green is for vegetables, fruits, whole grains and vegan proteins. Yellow is for lean proteins and plant-based fats. Red is for high-fat and high-sugar, processed meats, white flour, white rice, russet potatoes and artificially sweetened products.
—Mark Freeman, senior manager, global dining, Microsoft Corp., Seattle

Our Go Health Bar, which is a new service island with healthy meal combinations and snacks meeting nutrient limits set by our dietitians. Offerings are sold at discounted set prices: $2.79 for breakfast, $4.39 for a hot meal, $3.99 for a cold meal and 89 cents for snacks. We serve an average of 200 to 250 servings a day from this bar. It takes the guesswork out of selecting a healthy meal.
—Lisette Coston, R.D., executive director of support services, St. Francis Health System, Tulsa, Okla.

We participate in National Nutrition Month by hosting a multiday Health and Nutrition Expo in our dining commons. Students can speak with our registered dietitian about nutrition concerns. The nutrition staff also provides a number of services for students such as BMI assessments, analysis of body percent fat and blood pressure checks. A healthy recipe is featured and students can win prizes while testing their nutrition knowledge. The expo provides an opportunity for students to learn how to eat healthy in our dining commons on their own.
—J. Michael Floyd, associate vice president, auxiliary services, University of Georgia, Athens

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FSD Resources