Fourth Annual "The Best"

Fourth Annual "The Best"

Design

Best use of small space
JPS Health Network has multiple buildings on its main campus. The JPS Cafe is located in a basement area adjacent to the Tower and is not readily accessible to many staff members. While there is a McDonald’s on site, nutritional services desired to offer another foodservice option to hospital staff and visitors.

In 2013, we opened a small food kiosk in a corner area near the Pavilion’s main entrance. This kiosk area was named The Corner Spot and service hours are from 11:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The menu consists of assorted sandwiches and boxed lunches, wraps, a variety of salads and small desserts. The JPS Corner Spot has been very popular with employees and visitors, and sales collected in 2013 approached $100,000. Opening this additional foodservice venue more than paid for itself both in operating revenues and employee and visitor satisfaction. In 2014, the department is planning on extending the Corner Spot’s hours of operation to include breakfast and coffee service.
—Celia Krazit, R.D., director of nutritional services, JPS Health Network, Fort Worth, Texas 

Best commercial design element we’ve imitated
Creating a self-serve toppings bar at our high school, which is loaded with all kinds of vegetable, sandwich and entrée toppings.
—Jessica Shelly, food services director, Cincinnati Public Schools

The best simple design fix that paid big dividends
The serving lines in one of my school districts were old, dated and had sticker residue all over them. They just looked downright awful. The district didn’t have the financial means to replace them, so we covered the front with black contact paper. This really made it look new and the black color streamlined things. This was an economical face-lift that really looked great and saved the district a lot of money.
—Ruth Arnold, operations manager, Nutri-Serve Food Management, New Jersey

Moving from two serving lines to one line in elementary schools. It seems like that might make service slower, but by having two servers on one line instead of one server on each line, I can get kids through faster. This has allowed me to save labor by eliminating one cashier and having more kids participate in lunch since the line moves quicker.
—Jessica Shelly, food services director, Cincinnati Public Schools

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