School lunch makeover

For the first time in 15 years, the USDA has made significant changes to school meals in an effort to curb childhood obesity.

school lunch

Education is key, Binkle says, when adding new menu items to the rotation. He said many of the negative reactions from students to the new menus came from a lack of knowledge about what the meals were and not that the meals didn’t taste good. “I was talking to a teacher and she said this was a teaching moment,” Binkle says. “She was doing lunch supervision, and we had garlic hummus and pita chips on the menu. She said the kids were putting milk on it because they thought it was a cereal. They had never seen it before. Those are things you go through and learn.”

Fruit and veggie bars: Like Binkle, Karen Johnson, child nutrition director at Yuma Elementary School District in Arizona, says her district is already doing many of the things called for in the new meal pattern. “We offer fruit and veggie bars with dark greens, tomatoes and bell pepper,” she says. “We feel like we’re all stepping in the right direction already.”

Johnson says she puts chili powder on jicama sticks as a way to incorporate a vegetable students might not have tried before. She says the chili powder is a flavor students in that area of the country are used to eating so it entices students to try the jicama.

Another creative way Johnson’s team has boosted produce consumption at breakfast is offering breakfast tables instead of salad bars to add a homey touch to the morning meal. Managers decorate the tables with tablecloths and put the fruit in nice bowls. “The employees really enjoyed creating something of their own,” Johnson says. “And it was nice to have something different for breakfast that has more of a look from home.”

Johnson says she’s still working on how to fulfill the mandate that schools must show what components make up a reimbursable meal at the beginning of the service line. She says she’s not worried about that mandate, saying she expects the School Nutrition Association to offer suggestions. She also said she might work with the students in the art department to create visuals.

Reducing sodium: Johnson says the sodium levels “are on everyone’s mind,” which is something Karen Green, school nutrition director for Thomas County Schools in Thomasville, Ga., echoes.

“Sodium is the most difficult area,” Green says. “We’ve got to start looking at our recipes. We’ve set levels where we want to be in the coming years. We’ve got to start somewhere. For example, pizza. We said we will only accept [pizza] that has 800 milligrams of sodium or less next year. We’re working with our co-op group to look at the sodium level of entrées we are putting in our bids. We are also going to have fewer breaded items because there tends to be more sodium in those items.”

Green is not, however, concerned with the other regulations. She already offers sweet potato tots and fries, although she says the students prefer the white potato varieties. She also menus yam patties, romaine salad mix, broccoli and Southern favorites turnips and collard greens once a week.

Sweet potatoes: Dawn Houser, director of nutrition services at Collier County Public Schools in Naples, Fla., recently tried sweet potato fries after receiving a half a truck of commodity sweet potatoes. She says she was reluctant to try the item because they often become mushy on steamtables.

Houser says when the new breakfast regulations are implemented in two years, she is going to focus on offering dried fruit because the district offers so many grab-and-go breakfast meals and she doesn’t want the fruit component to become messy. She adds that with dried fruit the students can eat it at breakfast or save it for a later date.

One concern Houser has follows a recent report issued by the ACDA (American Commodity Distribution Association), which said that the number of fruits and vegetables that were going to be offered through USDA Foods was going to be lower than previous years. Houser says this is because farmers can get a better price for their produce in the commercial market.

More From FoodService Director

Sponsored Content
fish tacos

From High Liner Foods.

Younger consumers are driving an increased focus on sustainability, and more consumers overall are demanding a wider variety of seafood on menus. With shifting interest in seafood, operators need to be familiar with the seafood consumer—who they are, what they’re looking for and when they eat it—to more effectively boost interest in seafood dishes.

Understand consumer habits

Technomic’s 2017 Center of the Plate: Seafood & Vegetarian report finds that 65% of consumers eat seafood at least occasionally (once every 90 days or more), either as an...

Industry News & Opinion

The Missouri House of Representatives has initially approved a bill that would enable students with dietary issues to forgo mandatory meal plans at public colleges and universities, U.S. News reports.

Approved Tuesday, the bill would grant students with medical documentation of food sensitivities, food allergies or medical dietary issues the right to opt out of meal plans.

Supporters of the bill say it will allow students to not have to pay for food they can’t safely eat, while opponents say that the bill will negatively impact schools financially. According to legislative...

Industry News & Opinion

A study released by Sodexo indicates that gender-balanced management improves team performance.

The 2018 study is an expansion of a previous Sodexo study that launched in 2014. The expanded study analyzed 50,000 managers in all levels of management from 70 entities around the world over five years.

The study found that teams managed by 40% to 60% women had better employee and client retention, saw fewer workplace accidents and increased their operating margins and employee engagement.

Industry News & Opinion

Rick Farmer, executive chef for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., and Stephanie Powers, executive chef of Spring Harbor, a retirement community in Columbus, Ga., were crowned the winners of MenuDirections’ 2018 Culinary Competition.

Split into teams of two, chefs had 60 minutes to prepare and plate their own entrees using a preselected basket of ingredients such as beans, mushrooms and orange sauce. Each dish was judged on its presentation, taste and creativity.

The winning dish was orange glazed pork with a black bean and wild mushroom cake topped...

FSD Resources