Healthy Foods Sell in Brooklyn Hospital

Renovations to the center started this summer.

Published in Healthcare Spotlight

A renovation at Brooklyn Hospital Center, in New York, is demonstrating—so far, at least—that healthy foods can sell. The Brooklyn Hospital Center collaborated with Dallas, Pa.-based Metz Culinary Management to renovate its servery and dining facilities this summer, and District Manager John Boyle attributes the department’s 14% increase in transactions and 22% increase in check average to the introduction of healthier foods.

“Well-prepared and healthy food options are essential for our guests’ culinary experience and quality of life,” Boyle says. “New and healthier entrées have elevated satisfaction in our food options, and the numbers have backed that up so far. Many of the meals are prepared right in front of dining guests, and the cafeteria meets New York City’s Healthy Foods Initiative, which aims to create a healthier food environment in New York City hospitals.”



New food options include the Bravo station, where custom meals are cooked to order. There is also a deli station that offers a mix of fresh toppings, select meats and cheeses, tuna, egg and chicken salad, and an assortment of freshly baked breads, rolls and wraps. Everything is made to order and heated in a Turbo Chef oven for hot sandwiches on demand. Made-to-order Italian specialties include hand-prepared stromboli and calzones, fresh pasta dishes and fresh dough pizzas.



The renovation consisted of two projects during the course of the past year.
For the first renovation project, Metz installed its signature upscale coffee bar, the InterMetzo Café, in an underutilized space above the main lobby. The second and main renovation of the servery and cafeteria occurred during four weeks in June, during which Metz continued to operate at full capacity, Boyle says. The dining facilities were completely remodeled, including new floors, walls, ceiling, cooking equipment, furniture, and the introduction of several fresh and healthy food stations in the cafeteria.



The challenging part of the project, Boyle notes, was to construct a temporary space while renovations took place, because the hospital required that the construction did not interfere with any other aspects of running the hospital. The entire area was roped off and walls were built to seal off the construction. A temporary dining space was created offering everything the original space did, including a grill station, fryer and deli. 

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion
k-12

The School Nutrition Foundation —the School Nutrition Association’s philanthropic sibling—and Share Our Strength’s No Kid Hungry campaign have partnered to launch an initiative called Schools as Nutrition Hubs.

“No Kid Hungry really sees schools as a critical place in the fight against childhood hunger,” says Laura Hatch, director of national partnerships for No Kid Hungry. “Schools are really a no-brainer because they have the infrastructure, they have the experience, it’s a trusted place for families. And being able to maximize their programs and maximize the federal...

Ideas and Innovation
walk-in cooler

The walk-in cooler can serve as a gathering place for more than just produce. When temperatures rise, staff at Empire State South restaurant in Atlanta host meetings in the walk-in and make occasional trips to hang out throughout the day to beat the back-of-house heat.

Menu Development
college students eating

Taste may reign supreme when college students choose their next snack, but operators should also pay attention to factors such as price and portion size. Here are the most important attributes students consider when choosing snacks, according to Technomic’s 2017 College and University Consumer Trend Report .

Taste: 78%

Ability to satisfy my appetite between meals: 67%

Price: 64%

Portion size: 54%

Familiarity: 46%

Overall nutrition value: 40%

Protein content: 36%

All-natural ingredients: 29%

Fiber content: 27%

...

Managing Your Business
student shame
Let students charge meals

“We allow students to charge meals at all levels; even in high school, they can charge a certain number of meals. [After that is met,] they are given an alternate meal,” says Sharon Glosson, executive director of school nutrition services for North East Independent School District. Elementary students can charge up to $15 of meals; middle schoolers can charge $10; and high schoolers can charge $5. “Ultimately, [food services is] carrying out the policy; but we’re not necessarily the creators of the policy, [nor do we] have the final say ... because that budget...

FSD Resources