Arizona CCRC Gains Gluten-free Certification

Published in FSD Update

A simple request from a prospective resident has led to Grandview Terrace, a senior living center in Sun City, Ariz., to become the first CCRC in the state to be certified gluten-free by the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA). The certification was granted after Grandview Terrace spent more than $12,000 in kitchen upgrades and staff training in order to meet the requirements of the NFCA program.

“The process of creating and serving a gluten-free menu was no small undertaking,” says Director of Dining Service Terry Wallace. “It required us to change the way we do things, but the end result and being able to better serve our residents is most certainly worth the effort.”

After a prospective resident mentioned during a tour that she had celiac disease, Wallace and Executive Chef Ron Mendyka met with Bhakti Gosalia, Grandview Terrace’s executive director, to discuss the issue. The team decided that the potential benefits of being able to attract new residents made the effort worth the cost.

Grandview Terrace began by renovating a portion of the kitchen to become a gluten-free prep space, and specific equipment dedicated to gluten-free food prep was purchased. Then, the 14-person dining staff underwent five months of training with the NFCA to become certified. Staff were taught the risks of cross-contamination while learning best practices for gluten-free worker hygiene, food handling, preparation and storage. Wallace and Mendyka also began to create new gluten-free menu items; so far, about 150 items have been added to the recipe base.

Wallace adds that the initial upshot of the move was that the prospective resident has moved in and other residents have expressed an interest in the program. This spring, Grandview Terrace marketed its new gluten-free program by inviting the public to a luncheon.  

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion
k-12

The School Nutrition Foundation —the School Nutrition Association’s philanthropic sibling—and Share Our Strength’s No Kid Hungry campaign have partnered to launch an initiative called Schools as Nutrition Hubs.

“No Kid Hungry really sees schools as a critical place in the fight against childhood hunger,” says Laura Hatch, director of national partnerships for No Kid Hungry. “Schools are really a no-brainer because they have the infrastructure, they have the experience, it’s a trusted place for families. And being able to maximize their programs and maximize the federal...

Ideas and Innovation
walk-in cooler

The walk-in cooler can serve as a gathering place for more than just produce. When temperatures rise, staff at Empire State South restaurant in Atlanta host meetings in the walk-in and make occasional trips to hang out throughout the day to beat the back-of-house heat.

Menu Development
college students eating

Taste may reign supreme when college students choose their next snack, but operators should also pay attention to factors such as price and portion size. Here are the most important attributes students consider when choosing snacks, according to Technomic’s 2017 College and University Consumer Trend Report .

Taste: 78%

Ability to satisfy my appetite between meals: 67%

Price: 64%

Portion size: 54%

Familiarity: 46%

Overall nutrition value: 40%

Protein content: 36%

All-natural ingredients: 29%

Fiber content: 27%

...

Managing Your Business
student shame
Let students charge meals

“We allow students to charge meals at all levels; even in high school, they can charge a certain number of meals. [After that is met,] they are given an alternate meal,” says Sharon Glosson, executive director of school nutrition services for North East Independent School District. Elementary students can charge up to $15 of meals; middle schoolers can charge $10; and high schoolers can charge $5. “Ultimately, [food services is] carrying out the policy; but we’re not necessarily the creators of the policy, [nor do we] have the final say ... because that budget...

FSD Resources