Arizona CCRC Gains Gluten-free Certification

Published in FSD Update

A simple request from a prospective resident has led to Grandview Terrace, a senior living center in Sun City, Ariz., to become the first CCRC in the state to be certified gluten-free by the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA). The certification was granted after Grandview Terrace spent more than $12,000 in kitchen upgrades and staff training in order to meet the requirements of the NFCA program.

“The process of creating and serving a gluten-free menu was no small undertaking,” says Director of Dining Service Terry Wallace. “It required us to change the way we do things, but the end result and being able to better serve our residents is most certainly worth the effort.”

After a prospective resident mentioned during a tour that she had celiac disease, Wallace and Executive Chef Ron Mendyka met with Bhakti Gosalia, Grandview Terrace’s executive director, to discuss the issue. The team decided that the potential benefits of being able to attract new residents made the effort worth the cost.

Grandview Terrace began by renovating a portion of the kitchen to become a gluten-free prep space, and specific equipment dedicated to gluten-free food prep was purchased. Then, the 14-person dining staff underwent five months of training with the NFCA to become certified. Staff were taught the risks of cross-contamination while learning best practices for gluten-free worker hygiene, food handling, preparation and storage. Wallace and Mendyka also began to create new gluten-free menu items; so far, about 150 items have been added to the recipe base.

Wallace adds that the initial upshot of the move was that the prospective resident has moved in and other residents have expressed an interest in the program. This spring, Grandview Terrace marketed its new gluten-free program by inviting the public to a luncheon.  

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minn., has replaced a fajita bar in one of its dining halls with a superfoods bar, Tommie Media reports.

Aiming to provide more options for athletes and students with dietary restrictions, the new bar offers diners a choice of protein with a variety of toppings, such as beans, fruit, couscous and quinoa.

The superfoods bar has made a few appearances on campus since it was first tried for the school’s football players last summer.

“Word of mouth is getting out, and every day I get a few more people,” Ryan Carlson, a cook at the...

Sponsored Content
gluten free diet

From Stouffer’s.

A large part of menuing allergen-friendly cuisine is deciding which gluten-free items to serve.

In particular, college dining hall operators must decide whether to make gluten-free items in-house or to order gluten-free items from a manufacturer. Some factors to consider are: the size of the university, the demand for gluten-free options,and the ability to have separate gluten-free storage and workspaces in the university dining hall kitchen.

According to FoodService Director , 77% of college and university operators purchase their gluten-free...

Industry News & Opinion

Reading Hospital in West Reading, Pa., is using robots to help deliver patient meals, BCTV reports.

The eight robots, named TUGs, will be used to transport meals from the hospital’s nutrition services department to patient floors at Reading HealthPlex for Advanced Surgical & Patient Care.

Moving at three miles per hour, the robots will follow preprogrammed routes to the HealthPlex, where room ambassadors will remove room service carts from the TUGs and deliver them to patients. The TUGs will then return to nutrition services with dirty dishes for cleaning.

The...

Industry News & Opinion

Sodexo has partnered with fast casual Blaze Pizza to offer the chain’s signature pizzas, salads, beverages and desserts at select venues served by Sodexo, including colleges and universities.

Bill Lacey, senior vice president of marketing at Sodexo, said that Blaze’s growth in the fast-casual sector drove the partnership. Blaze opened its first unit in 2012 near the University of California at Irvine. Its pizzas are flash fired, cooking in under 180 seconds, according to the chain—a selling point for busy customers.

FSD Resources