Venison rules at culinary event

Published in FSD Update

The winning dish.

A venison quesadilla took the top prize at the second annual culinary competition staged by the Ohio Presbyterian Retirement Services (OPRS). Chefs Stacy Chesney and Patrick Young, from Swan Creek Retirement Village, in Toledo, earned a gold medal in the ACF-sanctioned competition for their Pan-smoked Venison Quesadilla with Fire-roasted Corn, Sweet Red Pepper and Tomatillo Salsa with a Salvadorena Crema Blue Cheese Sauce.

The silver medal went to Mark Farno and Matt Williams, chefs at Mount Pleasant Retirement Village, in Monroe, for their Bourbon-glazed Salmon with Warm Quinoa Salad. Brian Lippiatt and Brian West, of Rocknyol, in Akron, took the bronze with Salmon Roulade with Scallop Mousse, Parisienne Potatoes and Vegetable Medley.

John Andrews, director of culinary and nutritional services for OPRS, says, “In today’s retirement communities, full-flavored, savory food is the attraction. OPRS chefs know their craft and are proud to create this kind of food every day. This event, which is open to the public, is a way to showcase their talent.”

Nine teams of chefs, from seven OPRS communities, competed in the event, which also included a silent auction, the proceeds of which went to the OPRS Culinary Training and Development Fund. The dishes created may have looked and sounded rich and expensive, but they were neither. All entries had to fit within certain nutritional guidelines, including coming in at less than 700 calories. In addition, they had to cost less than $8 to produce.

“Our residents are the real winners here,” says Andrews, who notes that entries usually make it onto the regular menus at the retirement communities. “[Residents] get tantalizing, sophisticated meals that are also healthier than they appear.”

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

South Valley Preparatory School in Albuquerque, N.M., has launched a range of healthy eating initiatives to combat obesity, the Albuquerque Journal reports.

The initiatives are in response to a State of Obesity report that stated that nearly a quarter of 10- to 17-year-olds in New Mexico were overweight or obese in 2016. The school banned junk food on campus during school hours for both students and staff, and offers healthy seasonal meals in its cafeteria. Students also take weekly trips to local farms to get an inside look at where their food comes from.

While the school...

Industry News & Opinion

Food delivery company Good Uncle is expanding to 15 college campuses this fall, The Daily Orange reports.

The company plans to grow along the East Coast and is looking at opening at schools such as George Washington University, Pennsylvania State University, Villanova University and American University. Good Uncle hopes to open at 50 to 100 campuses by 2019.

Starting as a delivery-only kitchen in 2016, Good Uncle partners with local restaurants to recreate their popular dishes and then deliver them to college students. The company offers free delivery, no delivery minimum...

Ideas and Innovation
wahoo tacos

School lunch is heating up. As expectations rise in the noncommercial sector, the old-fashioned cafeteria has become a hot topic. Political pressure on schools has seesawed over the past eight years, and nutritional regulations on items like sodium and whole grains have been overhauled (and back again). Meanwhile, students, parents, teachers, administrators and policymakers are demanding more healthfulness and better taste from school meals, often for the same cost.

Yet the industry’s best are dedicated to getting better, even while looking to the future with caution. “There’s not...

Sponsored Content
WinCup product

From WinCup ® .

The shape of hospitality is always changing—and challenging. Take the boom in off-premise and takeout, for example, that is expanding foodservice beyond the four walls of the dining room. That trend is driving both commercial and noncommercial operators to rethink their packaging needs—from a practical operational standpoint as well as when it comes to addressing consumers’ needs and desires.

Take it away

The tide of takeout is rising: 49% of 18- to 34-year olds say they are ordering food to-go more often now than they were three years ago, with 36% saying...

FSD Resources