Emerging Trends: August 2013

Published in FSD Update

> 84%

The percentage of online ads displayed to children that were for products with high amounts of fat, sugar or sodium, according to a new survey conducted by the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity at Yale University. The study looked at food ads that were displayed on popular children’s websites to determine how many met the Children’s Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative, a program where companies pledge to advertise only healthy foods to children. The researchers also found that breakfast cereal and fast food ads were the most frequently displayed advertisements to children. 

> Edible Education

Want to know how sustainable your sushi is? If you’re dining at Harney Sushi, in San Diego, just pull out your cell phone. The restaurant will be posting edible QR codes on its sushi, which will take diners to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s FishWatch website where they can find information about the fish they are consuming. The QR codes will be printed on a rice paper wafer and a water-based edible ink will be used. The restaurant says it sees the project as a way to “further engage their customers in the movement by providing modern tools by which to become educated about sustainable seafood.”

> 20%

The amount that U.S. shrimp prices have increased in recent months, according to Thailand’s leading exporter. The hike is due to a bacterial infection that is killing shrimp in Asia, which has reduced output in Thailand by as much as 40%, according to The Wall Street Journal. The bacterium isn’t harmful to humans, but it is deadly to shrimp. The U.S. relies on Thailand for most of its imported shrimp. U.S. restaurants are feeling the crunch. Landry’s is considering menu changes or price increases to combat the shrimp shortage. 

More From FoodService Director

Ideas and Innovation
woman surprise

When I joined the staff at FoodService Director in the spring of 2015, I couldn’t believe how much there was to learn about the intricacies of the industry. My past experience, from kindergarten to my college days to on-the-job meals, would lead me to believe that noncommercial dining was a kind of automated process—an amenity that’s expected, and one you only become aware of if something goes wrong.

But as with my own household chores, there are no magical elves making sure the business of feeding students, seniors and hospital patients is done, and done well. Foodservice...

Managing Your Business
hands team

In November, students at University of Missouri in Columbia began leading protests against discrimination faced by people of color on campus—including some marches through the dining halls. Julaine Kiehn, director of the school’s campus dining services, said the 2015-16 school year was a tough one, but she was proud of MU’s students for being at the forefront of a national movement.

And not only did the protests launch important conversations with students, but also with staff. Kiehn heard the protests and thought that her student workers, at least, might not feel safe and welcome...

Ideas and Innovation

When it comes to sustainability, sometimes the smallest kitchen changes can make the biggest difference. When Chris Henning, senior assistant director of dining services for the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, switched from standard latex gloves to nitrile gloves, he also set up a recycling program. Once recycled, the gloves are turned into playground equipment, bike racks and park benches.

Henning says the nitrile gloves have been a good fit for his department, both in terms of durability and cost. “Participating in the campus buying program reduces the cost, as [our]...

Ideas and Innovation
elderly old hands

A family’s request for at-home meal support for a patient at Lee Memorial in Fort Myers, Fla., led System Director of Food & Nutrition Services Larry Altier to uncover a gap in care. He saw that only 1% of patients had been coded (diagnosed and labeled for billing purposes) as malnourished, while more than 60% of all Lee Memorial patients are over 65 years or older, a population that experiences the issue at a higher rate.

His discovery helped more rigorously identify malnutrition, but it also strengthened Lee Memorial’s community connection. The hospital launched a delivery...

FSD Resources