Building a kitchen that feels like home

Mennonite Home Care Campus, in Lancaster, Pa., recently completed a more than $2 million kitchen renovation.

Published in Healthcare Spotlight

Mennonite Home Care Campus (MHC), a 355-bed continuing care facility located in Lancaster, Pa., recently completed a more than $2 million top-to-bottom kitchen renovation in order to offer residents more food choices in an environment similar to what they’d have at home.

According to JoBeth Kissinger, director of dining services, the plan to renovate the kitchen grew out of the facility’s overall transition to a person-centered care model, which was completed six years ago. “Our facilities went from an institutional model to a household model, which is a homelike environment for residents,” she says.

After the transition to the person-centered care model, MHC’s 188 skilled nursing residents saw additional food options provided to the household. Most of the facility’s 135 personal care residents, however, didn’t see as many changes in their foodservice options. “Our kitchen wasn’t part of the original transition to person-centered care and it was no longer conducive to the style of food prep we needed,” Kissinger says, adding that, “We wanted to be able to provide more on-demand serving and choices for all of our residents.”

In order to provide those options for the personal care residents, the kitchen would need a renovation, which began in July 2013. The kitchen renovation was completed in four months, and additional modifications to one of the dining rooms serving MHC’s personal care residents were finished in January. In order to stay within the project’s timeframe, Kissinger opted to shut down the kitchen completely to finish the project in one fell swoop.

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