ANFP officers sworn in at national conference

Kathryn Massey, CDM, dietary manager at Floyd Valley Hospital, in Sioux City, Iowa, took over as chair of the Association of Nutrition and Foodservice Professionals (ANFP) during the recent National Leadership Conference, in Minneapolis. Massey replaced outgoing chair Paula Bradley.

Debbie McDonald, CDM, was sworn in as chair-elect and will take over for Massey in 2015. McDonald is program administrator for foodservice at North Texas State Hospital, in Burkburnett.

Janice Hemel, CDM, foodservice supervisor at Lane County Hospital and Long Term Care, in Dighton, Kan., is treasurer for 2014-2015. Ken Hanson, CDM, jail services supervisor in the Polk County, Iowa, Sheriff’s Office, is treasurer-elect.

Three directors at large also were appointed: Larry Jackson, CDM, foodservice specialist for Sumter County School System, in Americus, Ga.; Richard “Nick” Nickless, CDM, chef/supply and services director for the Department of Disabilities and Special Needs at Coastal Center, in Hanahan, S.C.; and Amy Lewis, healthcare sales and marketing manager for Hoffmaster Group.

Several awards were also given. Among them:

  • CDM of the Year: Thomas Schoenwald, CDM, foodservice director at Hot Springs Memorial Hospital, in Thermopolis, Wyo.;
  • Excellence in Dining Award: Arthur Bretton, CDM, foodservice manager at Our Lady of Consolation Nursing and Rehabilitative Care Center, in Merrick, N.Y.;
  • Distinguished Service Award, Member: Vicky Kearney, CDM, director of food management programs for Armstrong Nutrition Management;
  • Distinguished Service Award, Corporate Partner: Reinhart Foodservice, in University Park, Ill.;
  • Diamond Award: Minnesota Chapter of ANFP.

The theme of this year’s conference was Change, Choice & Opportunity, which attracted more than 400 attendees. Topics included a panel discussion on culture change, a session on healthcare reform and an overview of HCAHPS.
Also, for the first time, attendees were able to take a Virtual Dementia Tour. The simulation gave operators an opportunity to better understand what their patients with Alzheimer’s or dementia experience.

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