5 events aimed to draw diners

By 
Kelsey Nash, Digital Editor

baseball bat apple pie

Read on to see how some operations have piqued customer interest with themed food occasions that tie into the organization’s values or current events. 

1. Tastes around the world

global foods flavors

Cornell University last month held its first World Cuisine Night to give guests a taste of the global flavors offered on campus. Students could use one meal swipe (or spend $10) for a “passport” that gave them entry into 10 dining halls on the Ithaca., N.Y., campus. Each eatery served a different sort of global cuisine, including Middle Eastern, North African and Pacific Rim. 

2. A scientific approach

molecular gastronomy pears spoons

The College of New Jersey offered diners a peek into the connection between food and science with a dining services event boasting a “biologically diverse” menu. Attendees could get a taste of such offerings as cheddar insect larvae and cumin-roasted lamb.

3. Cooking on display

chef salting vegetables display cooking

Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital sought to draw the community with a three-part cooking series showcasing global flavors. The West Bloomfield, Mich., hospital tied the March events into National Cooking Month, offering tips for preparing Mediterranean, Tuscan and Indian eats. 

4. A home run

hot dogs peanuts baseball

To celebrate the start of baseball season, Ohio State University in Columbus set aside a day to serve a selection of ballpark foods in its Traditions at Kennedy dining hall. 

5. Big flavors for small palates

moroccan braised lamb

With the help of parent volunteers, a New Hampshire school district offered its elementary and middle schoolers a month of international cuisine, featuring different global dishes each Thursday, such as a Welsh potato-leek cream soup and Moroccan braised lamb with couscous.

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