2013 Silver Plate Winners: The Future of Foodservice

Winners make their foodservice predictions for the next five years.

With the 2013 Silver Plate winners firmly at the top of their game, FSD thought we'd ask them for their industry predictions for the next five years. Here is what you can expect for the future of foodservice.

Julia Bauscher, Jefferson County Public Schools
“In five years I see us to continue improving our programs. Hopefully, with the trajectory that we’re on, foodservice departments in every district will be viewed as an important participant in improving students’ achievement. By that I mean that the amount of respect that foodservice plays in a district will increase and we will be on the same playing field working together to help students achieve.

“In five years we’ll be confident with all the challenges that the USDA has recommended [in the new school pattern regulations]. We will have handled all the challenges of administering the competitive foods regs that were recently proposed. Overall, I see children joyfully making healthier choices.”

Angelo Mojica, UNC Health Care
“I believe that this is an exciting time to work in the foodservice industry, because the future will see many changes. In healthcare, my thought is that [many] hospitals will form into large systems and seek efficiencies though purchasing and program standardization. The bar has been set high for quality, which will need to be maintained to ensure that reimbursements remain high. But we’ll also be looking for ways to cut expenses as food and labor costs continue to rise. New technologies like sous vide will provide opportunities to present new and interesting foods to our customers. These changes will require a well-trained workforce. We will be responsible to create programs to train and stimulate the next generation of foodservice professionals.”

Jay Silverstein, Credit Suisse
“I think food facilities are going to start to shrink down. As the cost of building them, and the value of real estate rises, companies are going to recognize that they need to provide something onsite, but it’s not going to be the mega cafeterias. Services will fulfill a basic need. Tagging off of that, I think the attendantless micro marts are going to grow in popularity. We have a few of them and they have been huge. It’s on the honor system and we’re honestly not seeing much theft. I still think catering, client dining and in-house conference centers will still be big. Being able to bring clients into your building to interface with CEOs is so necessary. You’ve got to fuel that energy by feeding them.”

Ken Toong, University of Massachusetts
“I think the future of foodservice is bright. I think directors know now that they must focus on what the customer wants. We can charge for retail whatever you want, but you have to make sure you are competitive and delivering healthy components that supports local suppliers. Food will also continue to become more portable. Using social media to deliver your message and improve sales is just going to get bigger. We have to get [customers] more excited about what we are doing.

"I think its happening now, there’s more connection between us all. Menuwise, I think one-pot dishes are becoming more popular. I also think healthy items are just going to be a part of the menu. There shouldn’t be special stations for those items. Food should be cleaner and less institutional. I think small portions are definitely here to stay.”  

More From FoodService Director

Managing Your Business
business man smash computer

Foodservice directors spend a lot of time taking care of other people, whether it’s K-12 students who aren’t always eating enough at home, malnourished patients back for return visits or employees squabbling among themselves. That kind of pressure can weigh heavily—and come home from work. The Anxiety and Depression Association of America finds that 83% of men and 72% of women say stress at work carries over into their personal lives, and 50% call staff management their main culprit for workplace stress.

“Stress is very difficult in our world, and work-life balance is very much a...

Industry News & Opinion

Students at an Arkansas high school may have to take creative measures to get a meal, thanks to a school policy that prevents parents from dropping off lunches left at home.

The Catholic High School for Boys in Little Rock, Ark., last week posted a picture on Facebook of a sign that reads, “Stop. If you are dropping off your son’s forgotten lunch, books, homework, equipment, etc., please turn around and exit the building. Your son will learn to problem-solve in your absence.”

While social media opinions on the school’s rule were mixed, some commenters expressed concern that...

Industry News & Opinion

Novato Unified School District in Novato, Calif., has created a new vegetarian grab-and-go item as part of the district’s Meatless Monday initiative, marinij.com reports .

The Fiesta Rice and Bean Shaker, which is served in disposable cups, contains rice, corn, black beans, taco seasoning, corn tortilla chips and romaine lettuce topped with an optional salsa and ranch dressing. It’s also customizable, as students are able to select which ingredients they’d like to include.

The vegetarian shaker is made using produce from a nearby organic garden. Sofie Garcia, an employee in...

Industry News & Opinion

High school students in Dallastown Area School District in Dallastown, Pa., will soon see the addition of live prep stations in their cafeteria, as well as an area where they can access food at any time during the school day.

The district has partnered with Chartwells for the revamp, which will allow students to watch their food being prepared and also includes the addition of new menu items, says the York Dispatch .

Chartwells’ mid-Atlantic dietitian, Aliza Stern, believes these changes will be welcomed by students as they become increasingly interested in different types...

FSD Resources