20 Most Influential: Julaine Kiehn, University of Missouri

Kiehn’s extensive work with NACUFS has given her a far reach in the industry.

Julaine Kiehn
Director of Campus Dining Services,
University of Missouri,
Columbia, Mo.

Some people influence by getting lots of headlines and making splashy announcements. Others influence by digging in and doing the work. Julaine Kiehn is a digger. What Kiehn has done to influence the industry in her 24 years in foodservice is to help nurture and guide others.

“Julaine has been a mentor to me personally, but beyond myself she has given dedicated service to the C&U industry in many ways by giving her time, talents and expertise,” says Joie Schoonover, director of dining and culinary services at the University of Wisconsin.

Schoonover says she believes Kiehn’s extensive work with NACUFS is what has given her such a far reach. Kiehn served as the association’s president in 1998-1999 and has served as education committee chair. Beginning in 2001 Kiehn chaired a committee that revamped the NACUFS Professional Institute Program, which offers eight education institutes for members who want to enhance their professional development. Through her efforts with this program, Kiehn has been the unrecognized mentor of every person who has gone through the institutes.

“Many of the institutes are offered to teach, coach and mentor in a style that Julaine uses with her own staff to ensure that they understand all aspects of the business they are privileged to run,” Schoonover says. “She is always available to assist others as they are working through situations on their own campuses. She enjoys watching others grow and develop. She is a true mentor, coach and cheerleader.” 


Foodservice Director has undertaken a bold initiative by identifying people who we believe are having the biggest impact on non-commercial foodservice. Our list may surprise you and should certainly intrigue you. Our honorees have backgrounds as varied as their personalities. They range from the father of the modern-day food truck to the wife of a sitting president. They include operators and suppliers, chefs and consultants, CEOs and civil servants. There are traditionalists and there are mavericks. Well-known names share space with hot newcomers. In all, 17 people, two groups of individuals and one institution compose the list. It’s time to meet FSD’s 20 Most Influential.

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