Mount Carmel St. Ann’s Hospital, Westerville, Ohio

Creating a warm inviting bistro brings in staff and guests.

Also adding to the warmth of eatery are Corian counters—which replaced those made from stainless steel—and tile floors. Deli counters are now well-lit with menu items on display. The cramped tray line, a pet peeve of both staff and customers, has been replaced with an open format. Before the renovation, employees were on top of each other, says Baker. Food carts had to be left in the hallway because there was no place to store them. “We were bursting at the seams,” says Baker. When Janet Meeks, the hospital’s COO, spent time shadowing foodservice, she compared the tray line to the “I Love Lucy” episode in the chocolate factory.

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