Must-see Attractions in Charleston

A quick guide to what's to see in Charleston, S.C.

Charleston Main street at night.

FoodService Director’s 10th annual MenuDirections is Feb. 26-28 in Charleston, S.C. For those first-time visitors to the city, here’s a quick guide of must-see attractions in Charleston, which last year Condé Nast Traveler named as the top city in the U.S.

Magnolia Plantation

This 17th century estate features America’s oldest gardens, which bloom year-round. The plantation witnessed the nation’s founding, through the American Revolution to the Civil War. It is the oldest public tourist site in the Lowcountry.

The plantation is open 365 days a year. Call ahead for hours of operation during MenuDirections.
magnoliaplantation.com
800.367.3517

Boone Hall Plantation

This plantation touts itself as America’s most photographed plantation. Boone Hall is one of America’s oldest working, living plantations. Once known for growing cotton and pecans, the plantation currently produces strawberries, tomatoes and pumpkins. The plantation also features a Black History in America exhibit where visitors can learn more about the Gullah culture, the African American inhabitants of the Lowcountry’s coastal plans and sea islands.

Open Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sun. 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.
boonehallplantation.com
843.884.4371

Pirate Tours

Take this walking tour to discover the city’s pirate history, from Blackbeard’s siege to the romance between Calico Jack and Anne Bonny.
Weekly storytelling performances: Saturdays at 11 a.m.
Call for private or group tours
843.442.7299
charlestonpiratetour.com

Fort Sumter Tours

Take a cruise to where the Civil War begin and learn how Fort Sumter plated a pivotal role in the War Between the States. The tour lasts approximately 5 hours, with 3½ hours on the fort.
spiritlinecruises.com/sumter_overview.asp
800.789.3678

Source: Charleston Area Convention & Visitor Bureau

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