Product Cutting: Dijon Mustard


Applications for Grey Poupon.


Grey Poupon mustard was created over 220 years ago in Dijon, France.
Today, the brand is made from the same ingredients—white wine, mustard
seed and a blend of spices. The brand is available for foodservice from
Kraft in both the classic smooth style and the coarser country style.
“Both work well in several applications,” notes Jeff Basalik, corporate chef. “It depends
what the operator wants in terms of build—more subtlety or more
rusticity.” Package sizes range from .25-ounce individual pouches to 8-
and 10-ounce tabletop jars or squeeze bottles and 48-ounce to 1-gallon
containers. Here’s what to look for when evaluating a premium Dijon
mustard.


  1. Spoon the mustard into a bowl and smell the product. The aroma
    should make the nose tingle slightly. You should sense a nice layering
    of flavors and no off odors or overpowering heat. “Grey Poupon mustard
    is an enhancer—it shouldn’t blow you away,” explains Basalik.
  2. Note the texture and color. Classic Dijon is thick, creamy and
    golden; Country Dijon is coarse-grained with crushed mustard seeds
    visible; the color is a deeper golden-brown.
  3. Sample the mustard with small tasting spoons, using crackers
    and/or water as palate cleansers. The flavor should be smooth, clean
    and well-balanced—never muddy. “Rounded in flavor with a touch of
    heat,” describes Basalik.
  4. Test the product in several applications:

  • Mix about 1 teaspoon into ¼ cup mayonnaise. Taste the “bite” to
    judge proportions. Stir the mixture into cooked potatoes to evaluate
    its binding qualities.
  • Add the mustard to a vinaigrette and whisk or shake to test its emulsifying properties.
  • Spread mustard on a sandwich containing sliced, cooked turkey or ham. Note texture, appearance and taste.
  • Coat surface of salmon fillets or chicken cutlets with Dijon and
    dredge in panko or bread crumbs. Check adherence and cooking results.

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