Chefs who make a difference

These 10 chefs are influential not only in their operations but their communities as well.

Daniel Skay
Nutrition Manager/Executive Chef
Parker and Castle Rock Adventist Hospitals
Castle Rock, Colo.

Why Chef Dan?
According to Lisa Poggas, nutrition and environmental services director:

“Dan proudly mentors culinary interns from Johnson & Wales University, as well as dietetic students for foodservice management throughout the country. He takes every opportunity to share his passion for creative culinary delights through cooking demonstrations to breast cancer survivors to speaking with the guests in Manna (the hospital’s) restaurant. His excitement about his specials is palpable.

On Aug. 1, Castle Rock Adventist Hospital opened in the Denver metropolitan area. When we were asked to help design the foodservice for Castle Rock, Chef Dan definitely thought outside the box. He came up with a full-service restaurant concept to help minimize equipment and labor for cost savings. Eventually, he was able to convince the executive team that this would be a win-win concept and he would make it successful.

[The hospital’s] Manna restaurant features produce from our community and kitchen garden with meats and other products from local vendors, such as honey, goat cheese and non-alcoholic Colorado wines.

Chef Dan has developed a reputation throughout the community and Centura (the organization Parker belongs to) for offering the most sublime food. When there are board meetings for Centura, we are the destination hospital due to the caliber of the food. He continually strives to produce the most creative, flavorful and healthy dishes every day for Parker and Castle Rock Adventist Hospitals.”

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Ideas and Innovation
aquaponics produce

We partnered with a student group interested in aquaponics to build a recirculating fish tank and lettuce growing operation in our Oval Dining Center. The large tanks are stocked with tilapia that live in the water and fertilize lettuce growing in the recirculating water under grow lights. We then harvest the lettuce and use it in our operations. The unit is set up in the dining room where customers can see the science in action, learn about the process and enjoy the fresh lettuce that was just picked.

Ideas and Innovation
fridge system

We installed a remote refrigeration system as part of our cafeteria renovation. The main part of the system is located on the roof and controls all our refrigerated equipment, including the walk-in freezer and coolers, beverage refrigerator, etc. The system allows us to identify problems faster, and the elimination of individual condenser units cuts down on A/C bills as well as noise.

Industry News & Opinion

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