Chefs who make a difference

These 10 chefs are influential not only in their operations but their communities as well.

 
 
 

Youness Jaafar
Executive Chef
Normandy Farm Estates
Blue Bell, Pa.

Why Chef Youness?
According to Marianne Jones, regional director, culinary and nutrition services, ACTS Retirement-Life Communities:

“A chef at Normandy Farms Estates for a year now after being promoted from his sous chef position, Youness brought five years’ chef de cuisine experience, having worked in some grand local restaurants. He is familiar with French, Mediterranean, Asian and American cuisine. Youness is the type of chef every manager hopes for. He intimately understands flavor profiles; trusting him with menus and production work is never a problem. He is driven to meet the department, community and company goals, and he preaches the message of our mission and creates expectations for his team.

Nothing is ever too much to ask; his answer is always, ‘If that is where you are leading, then that’s where we’re going.’ He is incredibly adaptable. Working in less than ideal conditions at times, he makes do with what he has. He manages to turn out his restaurant-style menu on a daily basis using a kitchen originally designed for institutional cooking.

He also is innovative; most recently he has created a series of ‘pop-up’ restaurants for residents, including a French bistro concept called Chateau de Vire. The menu included three appetizers—steamed mussels, lobster mac and cheese and a Bistro salad—and three entrées—Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Brussels Sprouts, Onion Confit and Marsala Cream; Veal Tenderloin with Sweet Potato and Yukon Gold Gratin, Broccoli Rabe and Maderia sauce; and Flounder En Papillote, served with farmhouse potatoes and vegetables.”

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

Capital School District in Dover, Del., has a new food truck, one that will serve lunch to students during summer break, Delaware State News reports.

The truck will travel through the district every Monday through Thursday over the break and will offer lunch to anyone 18 and under.

The district offers weekly free lunch at the Capital City Farmers Market during the summer; however, school officials hope that the mobility of the food truck will help reach children who are unable to make it to the market, as well as enable staff to provide food that requires more preparation...

Sponsored Content
organic fruits veggies

From WhiteWave Away from Home.

Organic food has gone mainstream in recent years. And consumers of all ages believe organic food is not just healthier—but tastier—than conventional counterparts, according to Technomic’s 2016 Healthy Eating Consumer Trend Report.

No demographic group, however, values organic offerings as highly as those aged 18 to 34.

Nearly two-thirds (65%) of millennials, compared to 44% overall, say they’re more likely to purchase and willing to pay at least slightly more for menu items with organic claims, according to Technomic’s 2016 Healthy...

Industry News & Opinion

Chefs at Washington State University in Pullman, Wash., participated in plant-based food training earlier this month as part of an effort to introduce more vegetarian, vegan and allergen-free dishes on campus, The Daily Evergreen Reports.

Over two days, chefs worked in pairs with plant-based ingredients to create new dishes such as vegan pizza, cauliflower fried rice and vegetable wellington.

Washington State’s dining services said it hopes to expand the presence of plant-based dishes throughout all campus dining halls as student demand rises, noting that items with animal...

Ideas and Innovation
sandwich sub

At our corporate operation in the Kohl’s headquarters, two kinds of sandwiches are available daily—an artisan version and a more straightforward sub. While planning out a business model for the space, Kohl’s wanted something that was quality driven, but very sensitive to pricing for associates. Diners are comfortable spending about $6 to $7 for lunch.

FSD Resources