Chefs who make a difference

These 10 chefs are influential not only in their operations but their communities as well.

 
 
 

Youness Jaafar
Executive Chef
Normandy Farm Estates
Blue Bell, Pa.

Why Chef Youness?
According to Marianne Jones, regional director, culinary and nutrition services, ACTS Retirement-Life Communities:

“A chef at Normandy Farms Estates for a year now after being promoted from his sous chef position, Youness brought five years’ chef de cuisine experience, having worked in some grand local restaurants. He is familiar with French, Mediterranean, Asian and American cuisine. Youness is the type of chef every manager hopes for. He intimately understands flavor profiles; trusting him with menus and production work is never a problem. He is driven to meet the department, community and company goals, and he preaches the message of our mission and creates expectations for his team.

Nothing is ever too much to ask; his answer is always, ‘If that is where you are leading, then that’s where we’re going.’ He is incredibly adaptable. Working in less than ideal conditions at times, he makes do with what he has. He manages to turn out his restaurant-style menu on a daily basis using a kitchen originally designed for institutional cooking.

He also is innovative; most recently he has created a series of ‘pop-up’ restaurants for residents, including a French bistro concept called Chateau de Vire. The menu included three appetizers—steamed mussels, lobster mac and cheese and a Bistro salad—and three entrées—Wild Mushroom Ravioli with Brussels Sprouts, Onion Confit and Marsala Cream; Veal Tenderloin with Sweet Potato and Yukon Gold Gratin, Broccoli Rabe and Maderia sauce; and Flounder En Papillote, served with farmhouse potatoes and vegetables.”

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