Chefs who make a difference

These 10 chefs are influential not only in their operations but their communities as well.

Eric Cartwright
Executive Chef
Campus Dining Services
University of Missouri, Columbia

Why Eric?
According to Julaine Kiehn, director of Campus Dining:

“Eric has made a tremendous impact on our department, the Mizzou campus, the surrounding community and the industry.

Within Campus Dining Services, Eric implemented culinary training for front-line hourly staff in a variety of ways. At workshops he developed training for knife skills, taste analysis, grilling and other culinary-related topics. He also developed a four-level Culinary Development Program for food preparation staff. With the demonstration of the designated skills, hourly staff members can increase their hourly pay through this program. He teaches staff members how to prepare new items by demonstrating the preparation, having staff members see and taste the product and then allowing the staff members to make the product. Similarly, Eric has worked with our sous chefs to further develop their culinary expertise and build a team that works with the hourly staff members. The outcomes of the program have been increased quality of product and an increased level of pride of our staff, along with an improved image of Campus Dining Services.

On the campus level, Eric has helped improve the image of Campus Dining Services. We are more respected for our culinary expertise, our dining program and the quality of our food. This reputation has helped us recruit and retain students, as well as increased customer satisfaction.

Eric is also involved in the surrounding community. He assists with education activities at the high school’s career center, with the city and county agencies and in the local community. Eric worked with local farmers and organizations to purchase local products, which has improved our town/gown relationships and our image in the community.

Within the industry, Eric has networked with the professionals at the Culinary Institute of America at Greystone and Hyde Park. Eric coordinated campus activities with the California Raisin and Almond boards. Eric was fortunate to be in the first class of the Culinary Enrichment and Innovations Program (sponsored by Hormel at the CIA) and has provided input to industry publications and company representatives. He networks regularly with other chefs across the country and is active in the local ACF chapter.”

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