2006 Compensation Study: What I make

Salaries increased 1.9% for FSDs last year. Did yours?

Degrees pay off: Advanced degrees continue to pay off in foodservice. Eighteen percent of respondents holding graduate degrees earn more than $80,000 per year, the study shows, while only 12% of those with just a culinary certification are at that level.

Other statistics show that the average foodservice director is 49 years old, has been in the foodservice industry for just under 25 years and has held his or her current position for 10 years.

Hot jobs: A related FSD survey explored readers’ attitudes toward their own staffs—specifically those staff positions that directors feel will be the hardest to fill in the coming year. Results from that survey show that:

  • Service positions (dishwashers, porters, cashiers, etc.) will be the hardest to fill for the majority (58%) of respondents. Healthcare operators (both acute- and long-term care) cited this response well ahead of the average, while these positions are least problematic for B&I operators.
  • Mid-level Management (shift supervisors, unit managers) are the hardest-to-fill staff positions for 24% of those surveyed, with colleges citing that response more than any other segment.
  • In Senior Management positions (assistant or associate directors, executive chefs, etc.) are a concern for only 13% of respondents.

What they earn: As a companion to the FSD Compensation Study, editors examined some national average salaries for other industries:

  • Doctor $105,549
  • Lawyer $91,317
  • Stock broker $64,217
  • Teacher (K-12) $40,499
  • Restaurant manager $39,160
  • Magazine editor $52,814

Source: payscale.com; average of reported salary averages in select U.S. cities

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