20 years of FSD’s Compensation Study

Salaries have nearly doubled since 1991.

Twenty years ago, FoodService Director launched its first Compensation Study, a snapshot of salaries for operators in various non-commercial segments. This year, in addition to the current survey, FSD makes a comparison between compensation today and what it was in 1991.

2011 Compensation Study: Salary Comparison

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compensation highlights 

  • The average respondent to our 2011 Compensation Study earned $64,890 last year, an increase of 9.3% from 2010. He/she has worked in the industry 25 years, and the 57 employees in his/her operation purchased $2.35 million worth of food last year to prepare and serve an average of 1,843 meals a day.
  • Operators employed by their institutions earned less, on average, than those employed by contract companies, with respondents working at self-operated facilities earning $64,689 compared with $66,982 for those working in contracted foodservice.
  • Half of the operators in our survey said their staff size had remained the same in the past 12 months, with 23% saying they had increased staff and 27% saying they had reduced staff. College operators were more likely to have hired more people (44%), while hospital operators were most likely to have cut staff (32%). Contract operators were more likely than self-ops to have added employees (34% versus 20%). Operators in the Northeast were most likely to have cut staff (35%) and operators in the Southwest were most likely to have added staff (38%).
  • Food costs continued to rise last year for 87% of operators. The highest percentage of operators reporting an increase was in B&I, with 93% noting a rise in food prices, while in all other segments between 86% and 88% of operators said costs had risen from 2010 levels.

2011 Compensation Study: Industry Vitals

More From FoodService Director

Ideas and Innovation
vote buttons pins

On every other Thursday of our four-week cycle menu, we allow K-8 students to pick the entree choices. The media center specialist for each of the participating schools sets up the list of entree items on a computer for voting, and the winning entrees are given to cafeteria managers two weeks before the upcoming month to put into production. Students really like this, as it promotes ownership of the menu.

Ideas and Innovation
chalkboard

We highlight our North Carolina products on a large chalkboard in our dining halls, and also list any produce we bring in from our own agroecology farm. It helps tell our story—positive and local.

Ideas and Innovation
raised garden beds

We have raised garden beds that residents can reserve and use to grow their own plants. Whenever a resident brings me fresh produce from their own garden, I try and incorporate it into a dish. If I do end up using it, I will display the resident’s name and what the produce was next to the dish on the menu.

Ideas and Innovation
chartwells teaching kids

Curriculum for the mobile teaching kitchen centers around a single kid-friendly recipe, using ingredients that can provide talking points for nutrition, sustainability and food origins. “The recipe is the lesson,” Saidel says. “Every ingredient is an opportunity to talk.”

Earlier this year, Saidel, Perkins and Harvey did a student demo featuring roasted chicken and white bean tacos with greens and citrus salsa. “We can say, ‘Why are we using chicken instead of beef? Why are there some beans in here?’ You can talk about plant proteins and the sustainability and health message around...

FSD Resources